improve cx in organization

Want Happy Customers? Focus On Employees First.

There’s a common phrase, “Happy Employees Bring Happy Customers.” It is so true! When people feel valued and enjoy their workplace, they are more likely to be engaged and committed to delighting customers and maximizing their satisfaction and loyalty.

So, how does a company apply this principle to achieve business growth? The following are 5 effective ways that apply to all industries:

Create a Customer-Centric Organization

A centralized customer experience organization is able to monitor the quality of the experiences they deliver.

This kind of organizational setup enables teams to take action on Voice of Customer (VOC) feedback, including structured data (i.e. surveys) and unstructured sources (i.e. social media.). It helps ensure there are clear actions and ownership in the company, plus a champion of customer-first culture at the top.

Empower Employee Engagement

Employee engagement is essential to deliver exceptional customer experiences. Collecting customer feedback is great. However, this is a wasted effort if employees don’t execute on improvement plans.

Employees have a direct impact on customer experiences. In an environment with low employee engagement, success metrics like NPS scores inevitably decline. If you think about the most successful brands, they trust their employees and routinely measure their level of job happiness.

Again, if you want to delight customers, make sure employee satisfaction is included in the overall strategy.

Train Employees on CX

Every level of the organization must be educated about the importance of customer experience and how they can make a difference! This includes front line employees, managers, and executives.

Furthermore, every employee must be held accountable for delivering customer excellence. To promote accountability, I highly recommend including CX metrics in everyone’s annual objectives. Include the ability to get bonuses when employees achieve goals, similar to other key performance indicators (KPIs). I have tested this theory throughout my career and can unequivocally say that, when CX is a shared goal among all employees (not just a few) business results are significantly better.

Humanize Experiences

Emphasize the importance of humanizing customer experiences throughout your organization. This starts with meeting customer needs without over-complicating processes.

Often, small things mean the most. For instance, using simple “please” and “thank you” statements help make customers feel like they matter. It is actually the secret to Chick-fil-A’s success. Also, “eye contact and smiling go a long way in the drive-thru experience.”

When customers feel appreciated, they are more satisfied. And they are more likely to recommend brands to others. The concept is obvious. Yet, it’s surprising how often employees forget the human element when they interact with customers.

Leverage Technology The Right Way

Many companies use tools and platforms to fully understand what customers are saying across channels and touchpoints. However, they don’t always incorporate the Voice of Employee (VOE), which is a key element in building a successful customer-centric program.

Employees need to know their opinions count. When that happens, they become better performers who are more motivated to serve customers, fix their issues (“Close The Loop”), and do the right thing even when their boss isn’t looking.

If you want to drive accountability and a CX culture, focus first on employees. Then look at technology. Not the other way around.

WANT TO INCREASE YOUR CX SKILLS & TRANSFORM YOUR ORGANIZATION?

DoingCXRight by Stacy Sherman

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

engaged employees

Why you should care about Employee Experience

Today, we’re pleased to share a guest post by Annette Franz, CCXP of CX Journey. This article originally appeared on her site on April 19, 2016.

Have you put the spotlight on the employee experience at your company?

I’ve written many times about the importance of the employee experience, both on its own with regard to retention and performance and with regard to the impact of the employee experience on the customer experience.

Sadly, many companies still aren’t focusing on the employee experience. IDC’s 2015 EXPERIENCES Survey work found that 81% of companies listen to customers about their experiences, but 69.4% of companies do not measure the employee experience. Continue Reading →

Improving Customer Experiences Leveraging Social Media

5 Ways To Use Social Media To Improve Customer Experiences

Social Media is a proven, valuable tactic to increase brand awareness, product interest, and website traffic. Having managed social media campaigns for top brands over the years as well as leveraging social platforms for my blog, I can unequivocally say that social media marketing works. While the benefits of social media marketing may be common knowledge, some business leaders don’t realize and capitalize on social media as a useful source of “voice of customer” (VOC) data. Continue Reading →

customer experience survey insights

What is the survey question that will prioritize your #CX roadmap?

Customers don’t always do what they say. Airline customers say they want healthy snacks onboard planes instead of the “bad” chips and Doritos. Yet, when you stock the plane with nuts and dry fruit, nobody chooses them. They say they value quality over price. Yet, they keep sorting the aggregate websites on price and buying the cheapest tickets. Customers have an image of who they want to be. However, their behaviors do not always reflect that image.

Perception vs. Action

As customer experience professionals, we need to factor in this disconnect when we design  surveys. And when we react to survey results. Jeanne Bliss covers this at length in her book Chief Customer Officer 2.0. She cautions against chasing the last survey result without digging deeper into the why the customer responded the way he/she did and the overall context of the results.

The NPS question – How likely are you to recommend our company? – is in almost every CX survey. Some brands ask the question at a specific touch point in an effort to gather more specific feedback. Others use this as the first question in a survey, then ask additional questions for each touch point.

The second approach is better. However, even in that order, we still do not have enough intel to know what to prioritize when we receive the negative results.

Chasing the Wrong Solution

Let’s say a customer said he/she did not like your checkout experience and your returns experience. How would you know which one to fix first? One approach is to identify the experience customers dislike more and fix that first. Another, is to identify the one that is the “low hanging fruit.” The low hanging fruit is the less costly and time consuming problem to fix. Alternately, a third approach is to fix what you can control and de-prioritize the solution that requires you to influence other departments.

All of these approaches are the wrong way to prioritize your results.

So, what is the one question that you’re not asking to help you prioritize your CX roadmap? It’s the follow up question to the NPS/bad feedback question.

Will They keep coming back?

To use the example above, the follow up question to the negative feedback about checkout is Will this bad experience make you choose another brand in the future?” If the answer is yes, you face the risk of losing a customer and must prioritize this pain point.

According to Salesforce, it is 6-7 times more expensive to acquire a new customer, than to keep the one you have. Smart brands risk digging deep to explore the consequences of the break in the customer experience. They do not chase the limited feedback they have gathered.

Do not let emotions dictate how you write or evaluate CX surveys. You should not let them run your CX roadmap, either. Instead, use surveys to gather as much context as you can around negative feedback. When you get that feedback, evaluate it strategically, and you will get better ROI than most. You will also have a working #CX business case, and that’s a roadmap for your organization’s success and your success as a CX professional.

Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert. Follow us on Twitter for daily updates too.

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

NPS Survey Question. Should It be first or last, by Stacy Sherman

NPS Survey Question – Should It Be First Or Last?

I recently discussed the importance of getting Voice of the Customer (VOC) feedback and common methods, such as surveys, used to understand customer perceptions and expectations across touch points. To be effective and acquire actionable insights, survey questions must be designed following best practices. I also recommend a “test & learn” approach. Continue Reading →

Voice of Customer Takes On New Meaning (VOC)

“VOC” Takes On New Meaning 👮‍♀️

Over the past year, I have written dozens of articles about VOC, otherwise known in the business world as “Voice of Customer.” I share why getting VOC is important, sources of measurement, and best practices to drive company success. I am passionate about this topic because I know that Customer Experience (CX) provides a competitive advantage.

It’s not a hunch. It’s a fact! Today, however, I am writing about VOC from a different perspective. I am speaking as “Voice of Citizen.” Continue Reading →

customer loyalty voc

Customer Loyalty Begins In-House

Ten years ago, creating customer loyalty meant assigning a membership number customers fed back to brands at the time of purchase. Customers went through the trouble of keeping track of loyalty numbers, hoping to collect enough points along the Continue Reading →

Getting Customer Feedback

How To Get “Voice Of Customer” & Apply Best Practices

Getting Voice of Customer (VOC) feedback is an essential part of conducting business. I’ve seen too many companies develop new products and features without directly asking customers what they want upfront. Then they wonder why they don’t attain sales goals post-launch. Continue Reading →