Marketing & Customer Experience Trends From A CMO Executive Lens

Marketing & Customer Experience Trends From A CMO Executive Lens

Doing CX Right podcast show on Spotify with host Stacy Sherman
DoingCXRight-Podcast-on-Amazon-with-host-Stacy-Sherman.
Doing Customer Experience (CX) Right Podcast - Hosted by Stacy Sherman
Doing CX Right podcast show on iHeart Radio with host Stacy Sherman

What is the role of Marketing in the digital world? How does it relate to customer experience (CX) and creating real brand loyalty? Stacy Sherman interviews Jackie Yeaney, 6x CMO, to bring you answers to these questions and more as Marketing is no longer just about campaigns. It’s about telling stories, building brands, and creating intentional journeys for customers.

Additional topics include the connection between Marketing and CX and whether one can be considered the new version of the other. Also, the ideal organizational design and future trends that brand leaders must plan for to succeed in a high-tech competitive landscape.

Get Updates About Doing CX Right

Follow On Social Media

Join Newsletter

Press Play To WATCH the Interview

About Jackie Yeaney- Marketing and Customer Experience Leader

Recently EVP of Marketing at Tableau, Jackie Yeaney was responsible for empowering and educating more people about the power of seeing and understanding data. She has more than 20 years of experience as a marketing thought leader navigating the intersection of brand, customer experience, and data analytics.

Jackie started her career as an officer in the US Air Force, and then spent several years as a management consultant at the Boston Consulting Group. She has made a big impact at reputable brands like Delta Air Lines and Red Hat. Jackie holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an MBA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Learn more and follow Jackie at: Twitter and LinkedIn.

About Stacy Sherman: Founder of Doing CX Right®‬

An award-winning certified marketing and customer experience (CX) corporate executive, speaker, author, and podcaster, known for DoingCXRight®. She created a Heart & Science™ framework that accelerates customer loyalty, referrals, and revenue, fueled by engaged employees and customer service representatives. Stacy’s been in the trenches improving experiences as a brand differentiator for 20+ years, working at companies of all sizes and industries, like Liveops, Schindler elevator, Verizon, Martha Steward Craft, AT&T++.   Stacy is on a mission to help people DOING, not just TALKING about CX, so real human connections & happiness exist. Continue reading bio >here.

Fireproof Strategies To Lead Teams And Thrive Through Disruption

Fireproof Strategies To Lead Teams And Thrive Through Disruption

Doing CX Right podcast show on Spotify with host Stacy Sherman
DoingCXRight-Podcast-on-Amazon-with-host-Stacy-Sherman.
Doing Customer Experience (CX) Right Podcast - Hosted by Stacy Sherman
Doing CX Right podcast show on iHeart Radio with host Stacy Sherman

Fireproof Strategies For Business and Personal Success

We all face stressful situations. Some put out fires literally, like David Hollenbach, who spent 23 years in public safety, while others do so figuratively in the workplace. David shares fireproof strategies to thrive through disruption, overcome limiting beliefs, create a plan for the future, and leave an intentional legacy. You’ll hear personal stories and captivating case studies to help you be an effective leader and communicator to improve experiences for employees, customers, citizens ~ all humans. 

Listen, learn and pay it forward.

Get Updates About Doing CX Right

Follow On Social Media

Join Newsletter

About Battalion Chief David Hollenbach

Battalion Chief David Hollenbach (retired) is the author of “Fireproof: Your Grand Strategy for Transforming Failure into Fuel for Your Future.” He is a motivational speaker, coach, and mentor. He owns and operates David Hollenbach Consulting, LLC, and hosts the popular podcast “From Embers to Excellence.”

During his 23-year career in the fire service, he served as a

  • Firefighter
  • Apparatus Driver/Pump-Operator/Engineer
  • Company Officer/Lieutenant
  • Battalion Chief in Operations
  • Chief of Special Operations
  • Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) peer counselor
  • Public Safety Rescue Diver
  • Coordinator and developer of his department’s first leadership development program

David Hollenbach is a veteran of the United States Navy with a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Barry University. A major focus of research for his capstone was how strong, positive leadership can influence the culture of a large organization.

While studying at Barry University, he published “The Firefighter’s Creed” and “Women in the Fire Service: A Diverse Culture Leads to a Successful Culture,” an article highlighting the importance of gender diversity within the fire service in Fire Engineering Magazine.

He has spent years as an instructor, coach, and mentor, helping others define and realize success. Although he no longer works as a servant to the community, his passion for service to others remains stronger than ever.

Learn more: LinkedIn. Website.

About Stacy Sherman: Founder of Doing CX Right®‬

An award-winning certified marketing and customer experience (CX) corporate executive, speaker, author, and podcaster, known for DoingCXRight®. She created a Heart & Science™ framework that accelerates customer loyalty, referrals, and revenue, fueled by engaged employees and customer service representatives. Stacy’s been in the trenches improving experiences as a brand differentiator for 20+ years, working at companies of all sizes and industries, like Liveops, Schindler elevator, Verizon, Martha Steward Craft, AT&T++.   Stacy is on a mission to help people DOING, not just TALKING about CX, so real human connections & happiness exist. Continue reading bio >here.

5 Tactics To Align Sales & Marketing For Better Customer Experiences

5 Tactics To Align Sales & Marketing For Better Customer Experiences

Have you noticed that work teams, including sales and marketing, who both speak to potential and current customers, often work in silos? It does not make sense or cents. In fact, according to Harvard Business Review, sales-marketing misalignment is estimated to cost businesses more than $1 trillion each year.

Having worked in Sales and Marketing leadership roles throughout my career, I have learned firsthand that when the two partner together, everyone wins.  The customer experience improves, and the organization achieves better business results. Employee satisfaction and job fulfillment rise, too, resulting in less quiet quitting.

So how best to get sales and marketing on the same page? The following are proven tactics regardless of company size or industry:

5 Ways To Increase Marketing and Sales Alignment  

1. Communicate A Lot and Often. Establish reoccurring cross-team meetings to share what everyone is working on each week. By talking about key priorities, people will have a chance to see the overlap and ways to support each other. Furthermore, as the new year approaches, proactively discussing strategies and aligning roadmaps early on results in more productive working sessions. 

2. Walk In Each Other’s Shoes. The best way to increase employee empathy and support is by experiencing responsibilities and challenges beyond one’s role. If you are in Marketing, join the sales team at meetings and listen to the questions prospects ask. The information is gold for optimizing website content and marketing collateral. Sales leaders also can benefit by joining marketing meetings to align on segmentation, paid search keywords and content testing, PR stories, and more that help in storytelling with prospects and clients. 

3. Establish Common Metrics and KPIs (key performance indicators). When people share goals, they naturally work better together. They innately care to communicate more and consistently collaborate for the greater good. However, this can’t happen without #4.

4. Hire and Retain The Right Leaders. Knowing that culture starts at the top, it’s essential to recruit Sales and Marketing people with a collaborative mindset who share a customer experience (CX) passion. Managers must ask the right questions during interviews to avoid costly mistakes that occur when there are organizational silos. More details about the right questions in my upcoming newsletter.)

5. Do the basics right. There’s no scientific equation to create bonds between people. Relationships happen when there is an intentional desire to be helpful and supportive without egos in the way.  I highly recommend you pick up the phone, especially during times of conflict, and have a discussion versus sending a text or email that often gets misinterpreted. While we live in a high-tech world, nothing is more effective than a personalized and authentic conversation.

Ultimately, breaking Sales and Marketing silos is not just a nice thing to do but a brand differentiator that your competitors fear. If you have not been showing up as a unified aligned team internally and externally, start now. It is not too late.

If you like this article, you may also enjoy:

Is customer experience replacing advertising at biggest brands?

Is customer experience replacing advertising at biggest brands?

Is product experience becoming more important than advertising? Many business leaders are saying yes, as we’re now living in an experience or expectation-based economy where the quality of experiences delivered to customers determines company performance. 

My featured article guest, Jack Ashdown, shares throught-provoking views about the role of advertising and shifts in approach to acquire new customers and drive loyalty. I encourage you to read and share your perspective.

Is CX Replacing Advertising?

When was the last time you saw an ad for Tesla? That’s right, you haven’t, because Elon Musk believes the brand’s cash should be continually invested in innovation, not creative marketing.

Apart from Musk’s idiosyncratic and highly personal approach to marketing, Tesla has thrived in large part due to the UX experience of its cars. In some models, dials and levers have been reduced down to a steering wheel and iPad-style screen integrating displayed driving, navigation, and external internet access.

Digital disruptors like Uber, Airbnb, and Deliveroo have also chosen this route, making the decision to invest relatively little in advertising – particularly in the early growth stages of the business. Instead, ground-breaking concepts and elegant service design enabled them to transform entire markets.

This approach concentrates on the power of word-of-mouth backed by repeated positive customer interactions at all touchpoints. Brands such as Trainline harnessed this model, relying on organic growth through an excellent CX strategy.

It can be seen everywhere, even in the previously niche world of the stock market investment. Robinhood provides a cheap, easy-to-use trading alternative and reached 18 million accounts in March 2021, a year-on-year increase of 151%. It achieved such stellar growth by creating an app that took many design cues from social platforms and essentially gamified stock trading – enabling activist private traders to take direct action to support companies such as GameStop and AMC in the process.

By 2023 businesses worldwide are predicted to be investing almost two trillion dollars in digital transformation projects. In comparison, they’ll be spending a relatively humble $600 billion on advertising.

A big slice of the money spent on digital transformation will be focussed on digital services and consumer engagement or interaction. The global customer experience management (CXM) market’s CAGR is estimated to be around 12%, which should result in the market being worth around 14.5 billion by 2025.

This begs the question; if the brands that succeed in shaping or outperforming markets are those that step ahead of the pack with unique experiences and products rather than those investing heavily in advertising, will the center of the creative universe shift from advertising towards CX-orientated creativity leveraging data, UX and service innovation over the coming decade?

The CX medium is the advertising message

This huge predicted investment in digital transformation speaks to the emergence of fundamental changes in the way that organizations and businesses, new and old, are thinking about how to either generate sales or achieve long-term brand loyalty.

The digital economy is creating an ever more powerful cycle of digitization with, on one hand, ever better and faster digital products, services, and devices, and on the other the huge pressure on organizations to use technology to transform their operations.

 

Stacy’s advice for advertising & branding leaders: 

*Infuse the customer voice in EVERY business decision. No exceptions.
*Focus on creating better experiences. You don’t have to be  Tesla to gain a competitive edge.
*Hire and collaborate with customer experience (CX) and user experience (UX)  experts. It must be intentional.  

Read more about CX trends and expert views on debatable topics. 

*Should the Chief Experience Officer Oversee Marketing?

*What’s The Fate Of A Customer Experience Officer (CXO)

*Is Customer Experience The New Marketing? Is Marketing the New CX?

Should The Chief Customer Officer Oversee Marketing?

Should The Chief Customer Officer Oversee Marketing?

There’s a trend happening related to Marketing and Customer Experience leadership. McDonald’s hired its first (CXO) Chief Experience officer, Manu Steijaert, to advocate for customers in every business decision across the customer journey. Similarly, Walmart hired Janey Whiteside. And, Volkswagon did the same, and more are following the path.

 

Is Chief Experience Officer (CXO) a short-term strategy?

It seems like the answer is no, as more brands are restructuring their marketing efforts and investing in customer experience for the long term to gain a competitive edge beyond price. CX leaders and I share our perspectives with Neil Davey at MyCustomer, which you can read below. I know one thing for sure: Customer Experience, Marketing, and all departments need to partner and collaborate a lot. SILOS DO NO ONE ANY GOOD! I’m interested to hear your perspective.

Originally posted >here.

————————–

Some of the world’s biggest brands are restructuring so that the marketing department reports to the company’s customer experience leader. After years of the chief marketing officer having ownership of CX, why is this shift happening now – and will it stick?

When McDonald’s CEO Chris Kempczinski decided that he wanted the fast-food giant to become more customer-centric and reflect the way that modern consumers engage with his restaurants, he realized a big change was required.

Therefore, last month McDonald’s announced the creation of a new customer experience team, headed by the company’s first chief customer officer. But the devil was in the detail. Because in order to remove the internal barriers and silos that Kempczinski believes were leading to fragmented customer experiences, he also restructured the organization so that new CCO Manu Steijaert would have multiple teams reporting into him, including data analytics & digital customer engagement, global restaurant development & restaurant – and global marketing.

This structure, with marketing reporting into CX, is something of an emerging trend. A similar reshuffle at Walmart has chief customer officer Janey Whiteside overseeing the retail behemoth’s marketing department.

The news has been warmly welcomed in some quarters. Commenting on the news of McDonald’s restructure on LinkedIn, author, and keynote speaker Jason S Bradshaw said: “This is absolutely the way it should be. As the first Chief Customer Officer of Volkswagen Group Australia, the work got even better when I became the first Chief Customer & Marketing Officer … marketing is selling a brand promise – that has to be aligned to the Customer Experience delivered.”

And on the same thread, Mike Soldan, chief experience officer at Shmoop added: “We just moved Marketing into my org and the accuracy and effectiveness of our value prop has gone through the roof. No one knows what your customers want/need to hear more than the people that built and support the products and customers.”

Should the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) oversee customer experience?

Some were surprised by the move, however. Sandra De Zoysa, group chief customer officer at Dialog Axiata, notes: “This trend is rather intriguing to me personally. Traditionally, customer service and CX sell under the purview of the CMO and in more recent times, under the chief digital officer, where there is no CCO. However, to think that in the future these roles will be reversed and the CMO’s portfolio can actually fall within the CCO is a huge shift of power in the right direction. Wow!”

Indeed, historically customer experience has often reported to the CMO, rather than the other way around. And research from the CMO Council from earlier this year found that many senior business executives in large organizations believe it to be the role of their marketing department to have ownership of the customer experience. But many in CX circles believe that this is a flawed structure.

Chief customer service experience officer Alex Mead says: “This is by far the most common approach being taken by organizations, and from my perspective, it is completely wrong. Marketing leaders lack the understanding of the importance of slick, effortless, engaging customer interaction and service experiences, nor do they have the knowledge on how to deliver what modern-day customers want. That is why we often see companies with amazing brand & marketing experiences, losing their customers because of awful customer service experience journeys.

“If the CMO truly walks in their customers’ shoes, experiences painful multichannel customer contact designs observes the effect of missing/late deliveries, spots the huge frustration from customers that can’t easily ask a question across the channel they want, and in the way they want, AND THEN if they truly take the time to understand the customers’ pain points, and empower the right people to address them, then that can be used to positively influence the entire company’s brand and marketing strategy. But the reality is this is a very rare situation indeed.”

Should the Chief Customer Officer oversee Marketing?

Unsurprisingly, then, the CX community has welcomed the idea that the new structure could proliferate.

Speaker, author, and writer about Doing Customer Experience (CX) Right, Stacy Sherman, has spent her entire career in sales, marketing, and CX roles, and believes the growth in CXO roles and the resulting restructures will be a very positive thing for companies.

“I believe there is a trend happening and companies like McDonald’s and Walmart are paving the way. If you search on common job sites, you’ll see companies are hiring CX managers and related executive positions at a faster rate than ever before. That’s because a CXO has unique skills and training to guide a company’s direction and investments (tools, resources) that are in the best interest of customers. Likewise, a customer experience officer knows how to influence people to feel that they have a customer experience job, even when they don’t interact directly with customers. Without such a culture, loyalty goals can’t be achieved.

“I don’t see any negatives with CXO/CCO overseeing marketing, other than it will take time to gain believers and supporters.”

What do you think?

Let’s keep the conversations going. Join me on social media.

If you like this article, you may also enjoy:

What’s the Fate of the Chief Experience Officer (CXO) in reaction to Wallstreet Journal article. (ARTICLE)

How & Why the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) & CXO must partner closely together. (ARTICLE)

Is Customer Experience (CX) the NEW Marketing? (PODCAST):