customer experience culture

Why you need a defined culture to do CX right?

When designed and built correctly, customer experience expresses an organization’s brand. So, if your brand identity is playful and your copy has a witty voice, your space design is less formal.  In other words, your brand and marketing promises serve as a guiding light to your experience team. Similarly, organizational culture serves as a goalpost for the service side of customer experience.

What Role Does Culture Play in Customer Experience?

The texture of organizational culture is made of the behaviors and ways your employees communicate with customers. Without it as a guide, employees are left to their own devices. And the delivery of good customer experiences is left to luck. Without a defined culture, your employees tend to be more transactional. They do not create interactions that grow into relationships.

Think about it. If nobody tells you HOW to do something, you will think that the most important thing is just to get the thing done. The how is not even part of your thought process. The result of this is customer experiences that feel cold – experiences that do not make a connection with the customer.

Without that connection, there is no emotion. And without emotion, there is no memorable customer experience. You need to consider how you want your customers to feel when they interact with your brand. Now determine how you deliver those feelings.  You don’t! Your employees do.

Now, how do you make sure your employees deliver the right feelings? By making them feel the SAME feelings. That is culture! When your employees feel cared for, they care for your customers. When they feel integrity is nonnegotiable, they hold the highest moral standards. And when your organization has a defined culture, you trigger this positive domino effect that reaches employees and customers.

All Memorable Brands Have a Defined Culture

Organizational culture is the factory for the feelings you want your customers to have when they interact with your brand. It is not possible to do CX right without a defined culture in place. All memorable brands have defined cultures that are over-communicated to their employees and customers. Disney, JetBlue, Ritz Carlton, Zappos, and other hospitality-driven brands all have vibrant, recognizable cultures. So, if you want to join those brands and make your customers happy, you need to start by defining yours. Mission statements are not enough.

If your organization lacks a defined culture, it seeps into every department, at every level. Without a defined culture, there are no hiring standards for culture. When people are hired primarily for their hard skills, and culture is not part of the decision process, it is impossible to drive certain culture-connected behaviors. For example, if you have a defined culture and CARING is one of your values, then, as part of the hiring process, you assess how your candidate’s score against that.

If INNOVATION is one of your guiding principles, you look for risk takers and for people who are comfortable making decisions with limited information. If HR does not know what to hire for, there can be no active belief system in the organization.

The Culture Communication Problem

Last, but definitely not least, without defined culture your communications department risks demoralizing employees without knowing it. Culture shapes the language your organization uses to explain who and what you are, and how you want customers to feel. Note the difference between simple terms like “support center” and “headquarters,” or “staff” and “employees” vs. “team members” or “brand ambassadors.” Look more closely at terms like “agent” vs. “happiness engineer” or “concierge.”

A defined culture brings a vocabulary with it. Words matter. They are the tissue of culture and they need to be used with intent.

Unfortunately, like customer experience, culture is hard to implement in a sustainable way. The good news is we are here for that! If you aspire to build a brand that delivers exceptional customer experience, reach out to us. We will be happy to guide you through the maze of culture building!

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

cx goal 2019

The One CX Goal You Need to Set for 2019

Every January we all get energized to be better versions of ourselves. We post on social media about what we want to accomplish in the new year, thinking if we post it, we will finally do what we committed to doing. Often, this is where the story ends. With a social post.

Why do we so rarely accomplish what we set out to accomplish? Because we do not focus. We have LISTS of resolutions. All you need is one commitment. By focusing on one thing, you are setting up the path to achieve your goal.

Identify One CX Goal

For 2019, I urge you to make only one CX goal – bring about business success with your customer experience work. Don’t just do work in the general sense. Rather, set a CX goal that has a real impact on your customers and their experiences with your brand.

Own your challenge, too. Select an internal metric and report your progress on a quarterly cadence. You can use operational efficiency KPIs (faster throughput, higher percent FCR – first call resolution), cost KPIs (lower call volume, higher percent self-service), or revenue KPIs (higher conversion rates online, more repeat customers, higher value customers).

Find a CX Metric that Matters to Your CFO

Whatever you choose, do not stop at NPS or CSAT. Keep going until you find a metric that your CFO relates to. NPS is important, but NPS is not enough. As MaritzCX explained in their CXPA webinar, often NPS is managed as a transactional measure vs. a relationship measure.

This makes it hard to connect NPS to customer loyalty. NPS is right for us CX professionals. However, NPS does not make customer experience an important topic for boards of directors.

Measure What you Know

Back to your 2019 CX Goal. Depending on your role and level in the organization, you can prioritize and focus on different things. The higher you are in your organization, the more you need to manage metrics. We all know the expression if you cannot measure it, you cannot manage it. Without metrics you are lost.

Set a goal to collect and analyze metrics that link to customer experience in your organization. Depending on your business, you can start with any of the above mentioned metrics.

What you collect and connect to CX can also vary by CX program. For our operations readers, employee efficiencies (through time studies before and after) are a good place to start. For contact center managers, talk-time and FCR are the best places to focus on. Digital professionals should track looks, conversions, purchases, percent site abandon, percent direct sales vs. 3rd party, etc.

Focus Your CX Measurement

If you are managing a Customer Insights team, focus on one business customer in 2019 and service that customer. Send your people to observe the day-to-day of that team so they can understand better what survey questions to ask and what metrics help manage results better.

Don’t wait for the business to reach out and ask you for a standard report. Task a team member to really think through the lens of the business and build a customized report. Remember, customized does NOT mean get a drop-down per month vs. per week view. Look at the data with fresh eyes and see new insight that is powerful and useful to the business unit. Solve problems. Bring light to meaningful patterns. Become the adviser that the business cannot live without. Do this for one division in 2019 and then grow your scope (and budget, hopefully) to deliver value to more business lines in your organization.

Ask the Right Survey Questions

If you are an individual contributor designing surveys, think about asking questions whose answers can be converted into projects. If you do that, you may even end up executing those projects. And once you do that, you have propelled your CX career. For example, if you work in retail banking, ask your customers why they leave your branch. Then analyze the answers and from the patterns, you will be able to see the top 3 reasons people leave (apart from relocating). One of those reasons will be something the bank can change. Take that one thing and propose a solution.

These are just a few examples of CX goals with business impact. Depending where you are in your career and CX maturity, your CX goal will vary. Whatever your specific CX goal is, make sure that it has a tangible impact on your customers and your business. If you need to brainstorm on your specific goals, reach out to our Mentoring Program. We are always excited to learn about CX jobs and role challenges across industries.

Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert.

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

customer experience survey insights

What is the survey question that will prioritize your #CX roadmap?

Customers don’t always do what they say. Airline customers say they want healthy snacks onboard planes instead of the “bad” chips and Doritos. Yet, when you stock the plane with nuts and dry fruit, nobody chooses them. They say they value quality over price. Yet, they keep sorting the aggregate websites on price and buying the cheapest tickets. Customers have an image of who they want to be. However, their behaviors do not always reflect that image.

Perception vs. Action

As customer experience professionals, we need to factor in this disconnect when we design  surveys. And when we react to survey results. Jeanne Bliss covers this at length in her book Chief Customer Officer 2.0. She cautions against chasing the last survey result without digging deeper into the why the customer responded the way he/she did and the overall context of the results.

The NPS question – How likely are you to recommend our company? – is in almost every CX survey. Some brands ask the question at a specific touch point in an effort to gather more specific feedback. Others use this as the first question in a survey, then ask additional questions for each touch point.

The second approach is better. However, even in that order, we still do not have enough intel to know what to prioritize when we receive the negative results.

Chasing the Wrong Solution

Let’s say a customer said he/she did not like your checkout experience and your returns experience. How would you know which one to fix first? One approach is to identify the experience customers dislike more and fix that first. Another, is to identify the one that is the “low hanging fruit.” The low hanging fruit is the less costly and time consuming problem to fix. Alternately, a third approach is to fix what you can control and de-prioritize the solution that requires you to influence other departments.

All of these approaches are the wrong way to prioritize your results.

So, what is the one question that you’re not asking to help you prioritize your CX roadmap? It’s the follow up question to the NPS/bad feedback question.

Will They keep coming back?

To use the example above, the follow up question to the negative feedback about checkout is Will this bad experience make you choose another brand in the future?” If the answer is yes, you face the risk of losing a customer and must prioritize this pain point.

According to Salesforce, it is 6-7 times more expensive to acquire a new customer, than to keep the one you have. Smart brands risk digging deep to explore the consequences of the break in the customer experience. They do not chase the limited feedback they have gathered.

Do not let emotions dictate how you write or evaluate CX surveys. You should not let them run your CX roadmap, either. Instead, use surveys to gather as much context as you can around negative feedback. When you get that feedback, evaluate it strategically, and you will get better ROI than most. You will also have a working #CX business case, and that’s a roadmap for your organization’s success and your success as a CX professional.

Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert. Follow us on Twitter for daily updates too.

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

returns and refunds impact customer purchasing decisions

Return Policies Have BIG Impact on #CX. Apply Best Practices‼️

Online shoppers often determine which stores to buy from based on their understanding return requirements upfront. According to UPS consumer surveys, “66% of shoppers review a retailer’s return policy before making a purchase. 15% abandon a cart when Continue reading “Return Policies Have BIG Impact on #CX. Apply Best Practices‼️”

Outside-In vs. Inside Out Thinking

Outside-In vs. Inside-Out Thinking

Today, we’re pleased to share a guest post by Annette Franz, CCXP of CX Journey. This article originally appeared on her site on August 11, 2015.

In the world of customer experience, what’s the difference between outside-in and inside-out? Continue Reading →

great brand cx

Create Your Tribe: How Great CX Makes a Lifestyle Brand

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series about retail CX during the holiday season. See the other posts in the series here and here.

Two weeks ago we talked about the underutilized post-purchase touch point of the customer journey. Brands rarely leverage it. At the end of my CX journey with HelloSpud the CEO used her inventory management challenge to make me a loyal customer. Today, we’re looking at other small businesses that leverage customer experience to gain loyalty and brand power.

Smaller brands cherish every customer they have.

Newcomers to the market realize that their business is only as strong as the growth of their customer base. With that in mind, senior leaders work hard to shorten the distance between them and the customer. The CEO of men’s apparel brand Masorini does this very well. And he is using email, a traditional method of communication, to standout in a crowded market place.

Masorini sends a personal thank you note from the CEO after every purchase. With it the small online store recognizes the value of every customer and every customer’s experience. By doing this, the CEO himself shows his personal commitment to his customers. He inserts himself into the customer journey in a unique and powerful way.

Gratitude Creates Relationships that Promote Brand Goals

With the thank you note, the Masorini CEO accomplishes three goals: create a relationship, build loyalty, and increase sales. The email creates a customer-brand relationship first by thanking the customer, then by asking for feedback. Connecting and listening in this way builds and promotes customer loyalty in the shortened space between brand and customer. Next, the email aims to increase sales by offering 20% off indefinitely, and delivering a memorable customer experience.

Lastly, in a pop up window on the website, the brand welcomes email subscribers to “the Masorini tribe.” Words matter. He has clearly thought through how he wants his customers to feel. Loyal. To their tribe. Buy more. Belong to the tribe.

Brand Culture and Values are more than Ideas

Many brands claim that they have culture and values. Some even paint those value statements on their office walls. Far fewer use them in their hiring and performance management processes. While that is good from internal management perspective, the real differentiator is sharing your mission and values with your customers on their journeys.

llifestyle brand Thursday Book Co customer experience

This type of brand management requires a deeper dedication to the customer and his/her experience than any other expression of values. Shoes brand Thursday Boot Co. has done this in an exceptional way. It is exceptional, because it is bold. It takes courage for a brand to send its mission statement to every customers who buys a product.

Bold Brand Commitment

What if the customer does not agree with the brand’s belief system? Thursday Boot Co. is not trying to be everything to everyone. The brand knows who they want as a customer and that is who they are talking to. They are not out to get just anyone. This is how a brand has the opportunity to become a lifestyle brand. A brand with loyal followers, repeat purchasers, and loud brand ambassadors. I am one of them. Both my husband and I buy shoes from Thursday Boot Co. Guess what my mother’s Christmas present will be this year?

These are just two examples of great customer experience that were executed well and in a timely manner. Masorini and Thursday Boot Co. managed brand and sales expertly. In so doing, both companies are case studies for the ROI of CX. When brands nurture their customers, customers respond with their wallets.

The value of memorable experiences and well-managed customer journeys is powerful both for the customer and the brand. Aim to build more unique journeys for your customers. If you need help designing memorable touch points on the road, reach out to us. We love ideating, co-creating, and DoingCXRight with brands!

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

NPS Survey Question. Should It be first or last, by Stacy Sherman

NPS Survey Question – Should It Be First Or Last?

I recently discussed the importance of getting Voice of the Customer (VOC) feedback and common methods, such as surveys, to understand customer perceptions and expectations across different touch points. To be effective and acquire actionable insights, questions must be designed with best practices applied. I also recommend a “test & learn” approach. Continue Reading →

Can One Email Build Loyalty? #MYWESTELM

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series about retail CX during the holiday season. See the other posts in the series here and here.

For retailers, the holiday season is make or break. As brands try to use their strengths to differentiate themselves in the crowded market space, winners and losers emerge. Today, we’re talking about one of the winners.

As consumers, we are inundated by emails offering, countless deals, and discount codes during the holiday season. Few stand out. Continue Reading →

customer loyalty story

How a Personal Interaction builds Customer Loyalty

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series about retail CX during the holiday season. See the other posts in the series here and here.

I’m as surprised as anyone by this customer loyalty story. Recently, I tried to purchase a few sets of mini crib sheets (as it turns out, new parents need more than I imagined!). When I visited the Hello Spud‘s website I could only find one design. Although I was disappointed, I bought what I could.

What happened next is the story of one small business doing CX right. This note came with the sheets I received in the mail:

customer loyalty personal note

Prompted by what I suspect is web analytics insights, the company co-founder proactively reached out to me to help meet my needs and buy more of her products. Because of the data, she knew I did not have choice online. Sending me this personal note created a wow moment for me that put me on the path to engagement and loyalty.

Customer Loyalty Starts with Contextual Awareness

Melanie managed the delivery touch point utilizing contextual and customer data and creating a value proposition for her customer.  While brands today aim to use data across channels (web to mail), few are able to put it in action. The company founder understood who I was as a customer. Her customer experience data informed her about my on-site behavior, my needs, and my problem. She was able to act on it with a personal, relevant note and offer. Not only that, she created loyalty BEFORE I even used her product.

She used order and inventory data and reached out to me armed with information to resolve my problem (over time).  By doing that,  she converted me to an engaged HelloSpud customer, rather than a lost one. This shows how good data and the right approach to using it can create customer loyalty.

Customer Loyalty Comes from a Customer-Centric Priority

A customer-centric methodology is key to the successful outcome of my interaction with Hello Spud. It is the reason this story appears here, and not among the CX Big Fails! The company did not send an automated response. It did not deliver a message stating “sorry we couldn’t help you, would you like something else.” Instead, the company co-founder reached out to me personally across multiple channels (a handwritten note, followed by personal emails). She even offered to bring me samples so I wouldn’t have to wait until the next production run in January! This type of engagement puts customer-centric theories into practice. The brand created customer loyalty by making their customer a priority.

It is clear that customer loyalty matters to this small brand operating in a crowded field. Hello Spud is using data and outreach to create customer loyalty on the individual level and to grow an engaged customer base on the wider level.

Trust Breeds Customer Loyalty and Brand Advocacy

Hello Spud did something truly impressive. They made me a loyal customer by making me wait! The co-founder’s personal commitment to me made me feel connected to her success, almost like I was part of her team. I trust her commitment to me because of the way she communicated it.

In that state of trust, she then took the opportunity to engage me in a new way by recruiting me to support her business by sharing a review. This was a bold move (remember, I came to the brand seeking a product that they could not provide, and that their competition could).

Because the brand’s customer-centric culture was in place and supported by her action as a brand representative, it was a smart risk to take. The review I leave will be from a loyal customer.

Send us your questions on how to create a customer-centric culture.

 

If you like this article, please share! Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization. Register now to get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert.

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

 

hiring cx teams who to hire first

Hiring Tips: Who Should I Hire First on My CX Team

Although Customer Experience has been around for a long time, hiring for CX has become a greater priority for executives and funding committees only in the last 5 years. With that shift comes the rise of the CX Team in the organizational structures of banks, insurance companies, consumer brands and B-to-B entities.

How to Build a CX Team

Within the CX Team, the Customer Experience Director (or Customer Insights Director) leads the charge. Let’s say this is your role in your organization. Typically, you are the company’s first CX hire, tasked with building a team from scratch. Likely, in that first year you have to assemble your CX Team, you have limited funding until you prove the value of investing more in Customer Experience efforts.

The pressure to demonstrate business impact and ROI quickly makes your first hire even more important. As usual, there is no answer that fits all scenarios perfectly. We have some helpful strategies to consider based on the structure of your organization and your goals.

Hiring without a Customer Insights Team in Place

The CX cycle begins and ends with Customer Insights ( the Voice of the Customer program). With no customer insights team in place, it is hard to know where to begin.  If that team does not exist, your first order of business is to set it up. If you only have funding for one hire, hire a customer insights expert to learn what is not working well for your customers and what measures you need to take to improve the customer journeys.

Hire a manager level professional with a strong analytical background who is not afraid of doing the grunt work in the beginning.  You will need strong insights to convince your leadership of the need for investment in CX.

Hiring with a Customer Insights Team in Place

Once you know the parts of the customer experience that need to be addressed, you can hire an operations person – preferably an internal hire. An operations person on your CX Team helps you learn why your organization is not able to deliver great customer experience. An operations person is also invaluable for change management.

This CX Team member knows how to “sell” the changes in procedures and processes to the frontline. He/she is also invaluable with testing and trialing new solutions in the field. I promise you this hire is not going to be afraid to stand in front of customers and try new ways of doing things. That’s the kind of power you want to bring to drive the customer experience changes in your business.

Hiring with Customer Insights and Operations Expertise in Place on Your CX Team

Once you have the two foundational pieces of customer experience – the insights and the frontline know-how – you can hire a Project Manager or a Program Manager. The size of your portfolio will determine whether you should hire a project manager or a program manager.

If you have scoped one or two projects and have sufficient funding for them, it may be better to start with a Project Manager. If you have a bigger mandate and a higher level of responsibilities, hire a Program Manager for your CX Team. You will need this person to run the funding and reporting of your efforts smoothly. He/she will also hold different parts of the organization accountable for their pieces of your CX projects.

Hiring when you Have All of the Above on Your CX Team

The next two recommendations may surprise you, but they are critical to a successful CX Team: a dedicated brand manager and a finance person. If you have the basic CX hiring in place, and you have significant budget and responsibilities, you need to start doing some internal and external PR. You also need to maintain your credibility with finance in order to secure future funding. To achieve these goals, you need to add a dedicated brand designer and a finance person to your team.

These two positions on the CX Team are the hardest to sell to senior leadership because they technically exist somewhere else in the organization. The key here is to show why these professionals need to be dedicated to your Customer Experience program. For your CX Team to succeed, you have a lot of creative to do. If you are a change agent for the brand you are servicing (as you should be), you have to tell stories to your internal stakeholders through internal PR as well as to external stakeholders and the media.

Your success depends on a brand designer and finance expert more than you may anticipate. When I did not have a finance pro on my CX Team, I ended up doing the finance role at night since I had that skillset from my previous life. That, of course, is not ideal.

Hiring members of the CX Team requires you to take a long view of customer experience design, execution and goals. Internal and external hiring for CX forces you to look at the short and long-term goals of your CX strategies, how to implement them for your customers and how to communicate them to the C-Suite.

As a result, CX hiring is another good exercise in doing CX right for your customers and for your brand.

More from DOINGCXRIGHT

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

what is cx meaning

CX Meaning: What are the Faces of CX?

When I worked in marketing nobody ever asked me “What does marketing mean?”. Since I moved into Customer Experience, every time I give my job title, someone asks “What does CX mean?”.

Even though customer experience is recognized as more and more important for the long term survival of brands, many remain confused about CX meaning. Here are six ways you can answer when asked about what CX means.

Customer Experience means any one and all of the below. Each area of CX represents a path for CX professionals to impact business health and build successful careers. One of my favorite CX analogies is that it is like the blood in our bodies. When CX is done well, it touches every aspect of an organization. That’s what makes customer experience so much fun! You will never be bored working in CX.

CX Meaning & Marketing

Smart CX comes AFTER marketing

When I mentor Customer Experience professionals, my first question is always about brand promise and brand strategy. Marketing defines a brand’s customer service when it broadcasts the RTBs (reasons to believe or use a brand). The customer experience mission is to consistently deliver on those marketing promises. That is how CX promotes a brand.

CX Meaning: Policies & Procedures

Good CX means redesigning policies and procedures to make customers’ life easier

Sometimes Customer Experience is about putting yourself in your customer’s shoes and in your employees’ shoes. Do this to understand what your customers go through to get “their jobs done” with your brand. And what your employees do to get their jobs done on behalf of your brand.

Looking at it from the customer’s perspective, his/her “job” might be to sign up for your subscription service, pay a bill, or close an account. Often, Customer Experience professionals find out that a bad customer experience is bad by design. This is not malicious, of course, nor is it intended. But still, the bad outcome happened by design!

That kind of poor design starts from the ground up. Think about training materials and how they prepare frontline employees to deliver customer experience. Those materials might be teaching the employees to ask a question in an insensitive way as a result of regulatory requirements. Two policies might have been written in silos and might be asking the same questions of new customers in a way that makes them feel like your brand is wasting their time.

In a bigger, older and more merger-driven organization, CX is often about cleaning the so called “customer journeys” by revising existing rules and procedures. Although this may not be the most exciting part of CX for me, for an engineer, cleaning up these procedures is an exceptionally rewarding and meaningful job.

CX Meaning: Customer Engagement

Asking customers what they like/do not like about their experiences with a brand improves CX

Another side of CX, survey making and survey analysis, helps to capture the VOC (Voice of the Customer). This is the job of people who design, analyze and offer recommendations to business units based on what they have heared from customers. This part of CX is integral. It drives results when it is done properly.

The challenge is the integration levels within the business. Often VOC teams are perceived as the analytics group. Instead of being the drivers of change, they simply “service” the business when the business has questions for them. In other words, instead of the customer voice driving the conversation, the business assumes it understands what the customer needs. Regardless of the challenges, surveys, analysis and VOC are excellent opportunities within the CX fields, particularly for CX professionals with a background and interest in analytics.

CX Meaning: Employee Engagement

Ask employees what they NEED to deliver better CX and GIVE it to them

A derivative of VOC, VOE (Voice of the Employee) is an analytics version of CX that drives the engagement inside the company. Ideally, this team asks the right questions from employees to learn what prevents them from delivering on those marketing promises we mentioned earlier.

It is amazing what one can learn from the frontline. From illogical or user unfriendly UX design of every day tools, to approval levels of discretionary spending that make no sense, employees highlight the holes in customer experience that leave a brand vulnerable. When VOC and VOE are the same people, the impact of this specific CX job is palpable to all! Very few organizations set up a system for understanding and adapting to VOC and VOE needs. Often VOE is under HR and VOC is under Marketing, completely isolating the insights from one another.

There are important opportunities available for organizations who are able to bring VOC and VOE together and design CX according to those insights.

CX Meaning: Process & Architecture Design

Process and architecture design must allow free movement.

My favorite version of Customer Experience is the design and human experience planning of a product or service. It combines engineering, brand management, design, and VOC. Not many organizations have this CX job clearly defined. It is one of those things that you have to create for yourself. But doing so is not that hard, depending on the life cycle of your brand.

If the brand is building an app and it is a retail business, you can absolutely take this app and integrate it in the physical spaces of the brand. I can promise you either nobody is thinking about it or they are, but they are thinking it is in the distant future. You can take this side of the experience, build it and make a big impact!

CX Meaning: Organization Advocacy

Be an advocate for the Customer so everything the company does keeps the customer in mind

The last role in CX is the most senior. It is also the most difficult. These are the people that work with the executive team to provide funding for Customer Experience departments and programs. They are also the people who design the organization to deliver consistent, easy and seamless experiences for customers.

Think Elena Ford and what she is doing with her company. Executive leaders who are advocates for CX take into account VOC, VOE, marketing, processes and procedures, product development and employee training to build systems around the experiences customers need and want from your brand. For them, and for their brands, CX improves the way they do business. And that, at the end of the day, is the true meaning of CX.

 

If you like this article, please share with others so they can benefit. Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert.

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Voice of Customer Takes On New Meaning (VOC)

“VOC” Takes On New Meaning 👮‍♀️

Over the past year, I have written dozens of articles about VOC, otherwise known in the business world as “Voice of Customer.” I share why getting VOC is important, sources of measurement and best practices to drive company success. I am passionate about this topic knowing that Customer Experience (CX) provides a competitive advantage. It’s not a hunch. It’s a fact! Today, however, I am writing about VOC from a different perspective. I am speaking as “Voice of Citizen.” Continue Reading →

call center tips cx

3 Call Center Mistakes You Are Making

Before we dive into this post, I urge all of us to stop using the term call center. 2018 brands should not have call centers. Instead, engaged brands of today need Contact Centers.

If you are still responding to your customers only by phone, you are failing to provide efficient, relevant and timely customer support. Even worse, you are abandoning people who sought your help and never got it. Their tweets are floating unanswered in cyber space. After more than an hour of holding time, they hung up on you. Now that this caveat is out of the way, here are the 3 most common questions I get about call center management.

How Do You keep call center agents motivated and engaged?

The call center agent role is daunting. This leads to high turnover and low employee engagement scores. If you are managing a call center, you are likely struggling to keep up employee morale, before you can even hope to offer exceptional customer service.

The solution to employee engagement and ultimately, exception customer experience starts with the hiring process. Motivation and mission-driven service begins with hiring the right people. If your call center is staffed with people who see their jobs as temporary or transition positions, those people will not stay. They also will not give the job – and your customers – all they have.

Design profile of WHO you want in your contact center. Be ruthless about your selection process. Hire based on values and attitudes, not on skills. Hire with CULTURE in mind.

I appreciate that this is easier said than done, but it is not impossible. You can do it. If brands like Zappos and Ritz Carlton can do it, so can you. We all read about the incentive games and payment for performance. These are tactics that help maintain a culture of caring. But if you do not hire the right people, these tools will not make an impactful difference.

What vendor do you recommend for automating call centers using AI?

It is amazing that no matter how often my peers and I say that technology is not the answer, call center managers still ask this question expecting a silver bullet in the shape of a vendor name.

I will say it again here: you can use any type of vendor and still fail. You can also build a chat bot solution internally and succeed. The key here is recognizing two things that get overlooked all the time: aggregating and cleaning data.

Aggregating and cleaning your data is the foundation of any AI solution. Without this step, no vendor can save you. Garbage in, garbage out is exactly the logic here. So pause the vendor conversation and call your IT partner to discuss how ready your organization is for a chat bot solution. Do you have unique customer IDs? Do you have a relatively accurate matching tools and algorithms that can be transformed into a dashboard that can either help your contact center agents, or can be fed into a chat bot to answer basic questions?

Then, gather your call agents. Ask them what they need to provide memorable service. Empower them to help by LISTENING to them and by co-creating THEIR solution, not the vendor’s.  If Fedex asked the call agent who could not change my delivery address what she requires to satisfy customers needs, I am sure that the ability to change addresses in real time would be on her list.

What locations for outsourcing call centers are best?

This is another great example of the quest for the silver bullet. If you can remember one thing from this post , remember this – location is not everything in contact center management – culture is. Yes, you can outsource your contact centers, but the more money you save on the hourly wages, the more your brand erosion is going to increase.

When you realize that your contact center agents are an extension of your brand, you will be able to convert call center agents into brand ambassadors. This is when you are leveraging this touch point into a retention vehicle. For that business transformation to happen, you do not need to relocate the team to “the best location for call centers.” You need to look for the cradle of your brand and hire the right people in that location. That way, you will have the right ingredients to build a solid support center staffed with passionate people who genuinely want to help. From there, the Wow Moments pop up organically.

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Learn The Importance of Measuring Customer Experiece and NPS

How To Measure Customer Experience

There has been a ton of research about the value of delivering exceptional customer experiences (CX). Allocating budget and resources towards customer excellence is no longer a “nice to do” but rather a “have to do” to win in a competitive marketplace. Continue Reading →

cx pyramid failure mta doingcxright

NYC Subway CX Kills Chivalry in the City

Brands with values inspire customers who interact with them. Nike encourages us to be brave and embrace our differences. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation urges us to be kind and care for others. Brands like this use the CX Pyramid to promote their values and deliver the reliable experiences customers want. Continue Reading →

coworking space wework doing cx right

WeWork Does CX Right with a Wow Moment

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Coworking space WeWork is our latest example of how to do CX right. Customer-centric brands that are winning at CX, or as we like to say, the brands that are "doingcxright" use customer experience to deliver on brand mission and values. In other words, doingcxright brands like WeWork walk the talk. At its best, CX is much more than the passive delivery of brand-directed experiences. When a brand creates personal, relevant experience at exactly the right time, it can build a lifelong, loyal customer relationship. You are probably thinking about big data and machine learning right now, but sometimes, all a brand needs is people who genuinely care.

In our post about focusing on CX experiences over investment in "wow moments," we evaluated a Wow Moment that failed to achieve the customer experience impact the brand wanted (and needed). However, this does not mean that Wow Moments should not be part of the CX professional's portfolio.

Used at the right time and place along the customer's journey, the Wow Moment is an excellent retention technique. Co-working space WeWork understands this. As a result, WeWork may just have created an extremely valuable business relationship with me by doing CX right and using the Wow Technique at the right time and place on my customer journey.

CX Moments are Marketing tools

Last week, I booked a small working space with WeWork in our company building. I suspect I was the first person to use our partnership with WeWork. We completed the transaction pretty quickly on Monday. We moved in on Tuesday. On Wednesday afternoon, the WeWork team member came to our space with a present for my unborn BABY. Now that is what I call surprise and delight.

They never commented on my pregnancy. They just acknowledged it with a kind gesture. Apart from the word of mouth that this timely gesture generated, WeWork inspired me to write this blog entry, generating even more marketing for themselves. Are they perfect in terms of operations - not necessarily. But is that what I am writing about? No.

Did this Wow Moment make a difference in my perception? Absolutely.

When Doing CX Right is a Retention Tool

Another effect of the gift WeWork bought for my daughter is retention. Even if I do not keep the space I rented on behalf of my employer, my customer relationship with WeWork will not end when the temporary rental ends.

WeWork is a smart brand that understands this. The company is working with a much longer horizon in mind. I do not think that there is more personal gift for a woman than a gift for her unborn child. With it, the WeWork brand became part of my child's first moments and that will always bring a smile to my face. So if I ever need working space in the future, will I reach out to WeWork?

What do you think?

WeWork is Celebrating WOmen - That's Doing CX Right

The world of business is finally embracing the true consumer power of women. Women-only co-working space, The Wing provides work and community space exclusively for women, both empowering women entrepreneurs and interacting with those entrepreneurs as the end consumer.

The Buzz is solving a decades-long safety challenge for young girls. With its timely Wow Moment, WeWork joined the ranks of those women-driven brands and will be rewarded for making that stand. One thing Millennials, Generation X and Generation Z value and reward is a brand that takes a stance.

Check the Nike's stock price this week and you will know what I mean.

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

 

 

cx stress to success

Eliminate Customer Stress with Good CX

Good customer experiences either give back customer time or alleviate customer anxiety. If a brand’s CX isn’t achieving one of those goals, the customer isn’t getting any real or perceived value.  How can brands manage stress?  Better yet, how can brands build experiences that eliminate customer stress?

Causes of Customer Stress – Feeling Out of Control

The number one driver of customer stress is lack of information. Today, customers demand information. Knowledge is power and customers want to be in control of their journeys and experiences. Who can blame them? In our fast-paced environment, time is precious. Brands that respect customer time win customer loyalty.

Spectrum’s customer experience leaves much to be desired, but their call center customer experience is a winner. Let’s walk through that journey.  When a customer calls Spectrum, the phone system states the exact length of the hold time and offers the option to receive a call back.

In this case, the customer gets relevant information to make a decision (call back later or stay on), and he/she is given a CHOICE. Information and choice alleviate CX stress.

Transparency in the moment immediately relaxes customers. It makes them feel more in control. When designing CX solutions, keep in mind the solution needs to be comprehensive in order to create value. A message that says “Your wait time will be longer than usual” is not informative enough to empower decision making. Customers do not know what the usual wait time is, so that information is useless. To build a call center solution that reduces CX stress, invest in creating a technology solution that actually offers customers value. Do not stop in the middle and deliver general “buckets” of information.

The New Jersey Transit System and Long Island Railroad are building experiences that give customers the power to manage their journeys. Customers can see wait times and buy tickets via an app. Commuters know there is nothing more stressful than worrying about catching the right train. One delay can mean missing a meeting or a kid’s school performance. The stakes are high and so is the stress. On-the-go ticket purchasing alleviates a lot of that stress. No more lines in front of kiosks that may or may not work. No more adding time to an already long commute.

Transform Customer Stress to Customer Loyalty

Stress caused by uncertainty is a real customer emotion that can drive customer loyalty and revenues if a brand manages it well. Who does not appreciate being taken care of? When patients are a brand’s customers, like in the case of Mount Sinai Hospital, the best business approach is to look across your customers’ journeys and find opportunities to bring more certainty and to empower customers with information.

One thing that I do not recommend is to manage a prenatal “school” for future parents without building out the ability to find the address for classes, schedule and purchase online. After three plus calls and going above and beyond with the person on the other end of the phone, I eventually managed to book what I needed. But do I trust the brand as much as they need me to? Will I recommend them to other expectant moms who are eager for information and recommendations? No.

In this case, Mount Sinai missed an opportunity to alleviate one customer’s stress, to promote loyalty, and to create an empowered customer. Make sure your brand doesn’t miss opportunities to turn CX stress into CX success!

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

How To Be Customer Centric. Not Just Say It. Learn about CX From Two Professionals

How To Walk The CX Talk

According to Forrester, “84% of companies aspire to be customer experience leaders, but only 1 out of 5 deliver good or great CX.” Having worked in the field and studied Customer Experience topics for many years, I understand why and have some solutions to be truly customer-centric and not just say it. Continue Reading →

customer experience consistency

Get Customer Experience Basics Right and You Don’t Need to Invest in Wow Moments

Wow Moments are a Customer Experience hot topic. Customer experience professionals ideate how to build, prioritize, finance, and measure these Wow Moments. Chip and Dan Heath wrote a whole book on the topic: The Power of MomentsNo Wow Moment saves you from negative word of mouth if your brand fails to get the customer experience basics right or to deliver the expected brand experience consistently.

A Bottle of Champagne Cannot Save Your Brand

Last week I spent four nights at the Marriott in Berlin, Germany. My husband and I represent a loyal customer with high lifetime value. He has the Marriott Elite Status. We are in our late 30s – plenty of time left to travel. Our recent hotel customer experience confirms that, when basic CX work is missing, a bottle of champagne cannot save your brand.

The hotel employees had zero communication with each other. The maintenance person who unsuccessfully tried to fix the AC the first night failed to tell the front desk he recommended a room change. The next day, after the front desk said the move could “only happen later,” hotel employees arrived to take our things to our “new room.”

customer experience fails

When I forgot my flip flops in the original room it took 3 business days, 2 front desk phone calls, 2 in-person front desk conversations, and 2 conversations with room service to get them back. The flip-flops arrived the night before my flight back to New York. Somewhere among these bad customer interactions, we received a bottle of champagne and an apology note from the hotel.

Is Poor Customer Experience the Norm?

The sad part is that customer experiences like this are part of our everyday lives. The Mount Sinai Hospital appointments system is literally non-existent. A patient can schedule one appointment for the morning and another for late afternoon, but the nurses cannot optimize the visit and make both appointments in the same half-day. When my girlfriend was re-admitted to the hospital a week after her release, her parents had to answer the EXACT SAME questions they answered the first time. The system did not allow the new nurse to see the original answers.

In a nutshell, the hospital lacks internal communication systems for employees to refer to across touch points. As a result, the poor frontline employees constantly look like fools to frustrated customers.

What is the ROI on Good Customer Experience?

Since the need is dire and the impact is grave, why don’t brands just fix this? There are several reasons.

First, “fixing” this problem means investing a lot of money in technology. And investments need ROI. What is the ROI of improving service? Will you sell more rooms if the flip-flops get back to me faster? How does a customer experience professional prove that claim?

Second, organizations (incorrectly) fail to recognize this extensive work as customer-facing. If you go to any organization (the way they are set today) you will see that the communication systems for employees is considered “back office.” Leaders rarely make the connection that empowering the frontline is the key to improving CX.

Third, this work is not “sexy.” It just isn’t. It is full of Excel spreadsheets and ancient legacy systems that need to be integrated or rebuilt. And the solution must be real-time to empower employees. That brings complexity that drives the price tag even higher.

Wow the Customer with Consistency

Brands should work on wowing the customer by delivering consistent experiences and getting the basics right. They need to do that before they introduce all the great one-off experiences they can deliver to a few guests.

Customers are wowed much more if their digital key can open their room door in Boston AND Berlin. Or if they can rely on digital checkout in both countries. The bottle of champagne only brings value when the customer’s basic needs have been met.

Don’t deliver champagne in lieu of consistent, positive customer experience.

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

dominos digital strategy innovation cx bold move

CX Bold Moves: Domino’s Making the Right CX Choices

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series of CX Bold Moves. See all the DoingCXRight CX Bold Moves stories.

Domino’s Pizza made two CX bold moves – changing a nearly half-century old recipe and committing to digital innovation. These moves are translating into more sales and more engaged customers.

The pizza giant is placing a big bet on digital and customer experience and following through with a strategic execution. 50% of Domino’s orders are digital and two thirds of them are through mobile devices. Achieving such a meaningful channel shift is not easy (or cheap). The payoff – increased sales and revenue – makes it worthwhile. Last year Domino’s CEO Patrick Doyle told CNBC the strategy is not demonstrating impactful cost savings, but improved customer experience is driving sales up.

Thinking Beyond the Phone

Domino’s incorporated Alexa and Goggle Home as ordering channels. The in-home connected devices are a significant part of the Domino’s voice strategy to create customer experiences that drive sales. Similar to JetBlue, Domino’s believes that future customer interactions with brands will be completely digital and not tied to devices like phones. JetBlue’s facial recognition product does not require customers to have any paper, or a phone, to board a plane. Similarly, Domino’s is building the ability to order pizza using only your voice.

Going Outside the Home

After listening to customers say they want to get pizza delivery on the beach or at a game, Domino’s announced its plan to deliver pizza anywhere their customers are. The brand took a customer need and built a product around it – a smart CX move executed in a bold way.

Dennis Maloney, Domino’s CTO, stated that this product is not a case of discovering new technology. Rather, it is an example of a new use of existing technology – this is exactly how we define innovation! Of course, there are caveats around the current version of the product. The delivery spots are pre-defined and not available everywhere. But that is not really the point. The point is that Domino’s stock has gone up 5000% since 2008 based on a new recipe and this kind of digital transformation. The brand put the customer’s needs and desires at the center of its product design and it is winning, big time. It is a great CX story to move from a tweet like “worst pizza I’ve ever had” to ordering pizza on Twitter using just the pizza emoji.

Making Hard Choices

Delivering an item to customers where and when they want it satisfies a standard customer experience need, but it is complex to accomplish. Brands like Amazon and Zappos grew their customer bases on that basic offering alone. But Domino’s is not just perfecting delivery with this strategy. The brand showed the strength to throw away a 49-year-old recipe. Many brands can’t manage to make a transformation like that, and suffer the consequences (see ToysRUs and so many others). In Shift Ahead, Allen Adamson talks about how National Geographic magazine died from its refusal to acknowledge the digital trend and shift to other channels. The book also covers Playboy’s inability to reinvent when times changed. Both brands did not move fast enough and fell into oblivion.

Domino’s shifted. Domino’s made the big bet on CX. For those of us working in customer experience, this is an impressive – and inspiring – move from strategy to execution. Building hot spots and a customer journey around those hot spots is neither easy nor cheap. If it pays off, Domino’s will have created an entirely new customer segment that does not exist today.

Now that is genius. Creating a new product, and a new industry/business segment? We’re witnessing the ultimate shift to the future.

 

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

drowning in data no insights

A Lot of Data, Not Enough Insight

A month ago I saw a Forrester presentation on Customer Experience measurement that began with a great quote from the Global Bank: “We are drowning in data and starving for insight.”

Aren’t we all?

Most organizations have more data than they ever could have wanted, but that data is either sitting idle in databases or cloud environments, or it is used sub-optimally. Why is it that WeWork can build a tool to manage its 350 properties as a website and digitally view every detail about every building, but Fairway regularly emails me with first time user coupons that I am not eligible for as an existing customer?

Make Data Usable

The answer to this question is fundamentally simple, but practically complex. The first step is to centralize and clean the data so it can be used in an actionable way to extract insights. For existing companies this requires organizational redesign. That makes this step complex, political, and difficult to execute.

In one case, a major brand acquired three small start-ups with the business strategy to grow its customer base. The brand worked on learning how the three customer segments feel and what each segment wants in order to optimize the brand’s offering with three different products. Even though this was the correct first step, the strategy did not progress well. The company was not ready to centralize the customer insights systems and the teams of the three distinct brands they had acquired. Each start-up had its own customer database and customer definitions. None was open about giving access to that data. Thus no insights were derived from any of the three brands.

This case only scratches the surface of how companies miss opportunities with data. Accessing and aggregating data is an essential first step for all organizations, but that is not enough to derive insights. Even after teams and data are centralized and aggregated, insights are not available until the definitions of the data are aligned. How is a customer defined? How far back should the data go? What spend per customer makes that customer “valuable”?

Get Everyone in the Room

Organizations must answer these and many more questions in order to make available the capability of data insights. Often, companies complete step one, aggregate the data, but fail to analyze it and define the key parameters of it. Why? The answers should come from the consumers of the insights, not the technology teams building the insights. And those people are not in the room. Until there is a real engagement by the business and a collaboration among the teams, no one is getting any insights from their data.

Democratize Data

The last step of getting insight out of data might seem the simplest, but it is often missing. The quality of insights is directly correlated to the quality of the questions asked from the data. I will repeat that. The questions asked of data are the engine of the insights derived from data. This is where democratizing the cleaned data with a very user friendly UI is key. Good questions are rarely formed on the spot. As business challenges arise and new situations emerge, questions come out. It is important that access to the data is readily available (no coding or SQL skills necessary!!) to all so the end users can run reports and get the answers they need – and can act upon – in real time.

Successful brands like WeWork turn data into a tool. When companies perceive data as a tool, they create real value for customers. And when they fail to make the difficult steps of organizational redesign and pay for cleaning the data, we receive those coupons we can’t cash in.

View more of our conversations about data, and send us your questions about how to democratize and optimize data to improve customer experience in your organization.

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations

data tips for customer experience

Lessons Learned at the Forrester Conference: “Data is the New Sexy”

Once a year I look for an event or a conference to attend where I can learn something new and get better at what I do. This year I attended the Forrester Global Council Meeting and the CXNYC2018 Forum in New York.  Usually, the big win from events like this is the opportunity to network and meet new contacts. This year, though, the Council meeting felt like school – which I loved. These are the aha moments I am eager to share with you.

“Stop decorating. Start renovating.”

Do not build a CX strategy that is disconnected from your business strategy and that nobody knows. Don’t maintain a VOC program that tries to fix journeys that were never built with the customer in mind. And stop obsessing over NPS scores versus improving the customer experience.

Instead, focus on your customer needs and what your customers perceive as value, then build your competitive advantage around that. Listen to your employees, who often have the best ideas. Create customer business value. Then execute, execute, execute!

Research is a real thing!

There are many tools customer experience professionals can use to conduct customer research. Depending on which phase of your discovery you are in, or how strategic or tactical the question you are working on answering is, you can use different tools. The broader the question you are asking, the more qualitative your methods should be.

At the discovery phase, when you are looking to find what problems exist, you can do interviews, diary studies or ethnography. If the problems are defined and you need to find the best way to solve those problems, you can get more specific with surveys and usability testing. If you are looking to evaluate a solution that you have built, you can do A/B/multivariate testing and cognitive walkthroughs.

“Data is the new Sexy!”

Customer obsession is nothing more than a dream if you lack the analytics to drive it. You achieve productive customer insights only when you are able to capture and analyze data across channels. CX insight professionals need to be comfortable looking at data from online to offline channels, and they need to derive insights from known data to anonymous data.

Customer analytics methods are interconnected and have dependencies that must be kept in mind. It is impossible to get to customer lifetime value without a solid grasp on customer churn. Understanding the sequence and educating your executives about the complexity and funding required to get end-to-end insights from data is imperative to your organization’s success and your customers’ satisfaction.  Without data, your strategy is based on opinion. You need a data-led strategy to survive.

Now start aggregating data!

If you like this article, please share with others so they can benefit. Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

What are customer personas? Why create them?

Customer Personas…What’s All The Hype?

Whether new to CX or looking to expand your current knowledge, it is important to learn about what, when, and how to develop personas so that you can serve your customers better. Knowing what personas are NOT is equally important to create desired outcomes versus hinder them. Continue Reading →

customer experience career tips

4 Career Tips for CX Professionals

In honor of the 4th of July, we have rounded up 4 career tips for CX professionals. Set aside some time during the break from work to take stock in your CX career and evaluate steps you need to advance to the next level. Continue Reading →

Big Fails: FedEx Omnichannel Disaster

In our Strategy, Org Design & Culture series we cover customer-focused companies that are willing to adapt, take risks and discover new ways of staying relevant. Sometimes, we encounter brands that are missing the mark on basic customer expectations. These are CX Big Fails. Failures likes these can teach CX professionals as much about the impact of CX strategy as successes can. Our teacher today is FedEx.

Among the world’s largest transportation companies, FedEx made the top 5 in the 2017 Forbes Global ranking. This is the brand that invented the real-time tracking packages service. Yet, customers CANNOT change FedEx delivery dates over the phone. I learned that first hand when I tried to complete that simple transaction last week.

Taking a Vacation from Intuitive CX

You may ask why I made a phone call if I am a customer experience professional and an innovator? Because I am always on the go and multitasking. Despite self-service, there will always be use cases for phone as a channel. My customer expectation from a brand like FedEx dictated the brand would have a chatbot system to take care of a simple transaction like changing a delivery date. A request like mine must be in the top ten questions for a delivery company.

To my surprise, there was no chatbot. When I reached the representative, she told me she did not have access to change my delivery date. I needed to go online with my tracking number, expand the More Details Link and choose Hold, On Vacation, or something like this to change my date. Kiss first call resolution goodbye. Also kiss low effort score goodbye!

Last, but not least, according to FedEx, we are to understand that “Vacation” means “Change Delivery Date.” One of the foundational principles for delivering good customer experience is to enable front line employees to do their job. Tools and resources allow a brand that cares about the customers to do that. The fact that FedEx agents are not given those tools is shocking. On top of that, the non-intuitive navigation copy guarantees additional calls (costs) to the contact center by confused customers desperate to find a common Change Delivery Date field that doesn’t exist.

Locked Out of the Customer Journey

My new (lowered) customer expectation was that I could solve my issue and that the self-service channel would be quick and seamless. As customers, we all encounter system limitations, even from brands we like and trust. At this point, I was still a fan of FedEx. A few hours later, I went online to do what I was instructed to do.

After clicking the Hold, on Vacation button, I was asked to register as a customer. This is when the fun picked up again!  When a customer registers he/she is required to verify their address. The Fedex website offers two ways to verify address: through MAIL (days after you actually needed to change a delivery date on your package), or by answering a four question survey, two of which are inquiring about the names of PAST residents of your home.

The questions are multiple choice. Offered no alternative, I tried to guess which names lived in my New York City apartment before I did. And I got locked out. At this point, I made the second call to FedEx. The customer agent said he could not help me. Period. When I asked for his supervisor, he said that he does not have one since ALL supervisors left at 10:00 pm ( I called at 10:30 pm). At the end, I was NOT ABLE to change my delivery date after having omnichannel transactions with the brand.

This is not only a failed move, it is also a bad customer experience, plain and simple. I never got a survey to share my feedback, but needless to say, if given the choice, I will never use FedEx again.

Many brands have customer journeys that are so complex that they remain unsolved. This is understandable, given the growing complexities of customer needs and expectations. To change a delivery date when you interact with an iconic courier brand should not be one such complexity. Table stakes cannot be compromised. Dominos had to change their recipe because people did not like the taste of their pizza. Similarly, FedEx needs to ensure they deliver the main value for the customer – delivering packages at the right address at the most convenient time for the customer. If they cannot even do that, they will not enter the future of services and they can kiss that top 5 ranking goodbye.

If you like this article, please share with others so they can benefit. Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

CX Bold Moves Cadillac DoingCXRight

CX Bold Moves: Cadillac Scores Millennial Customers with Future-Forward Thinking

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series of CX Bold Moves. See all the DoingCXRight CX Bold Moves stories.
The automotive industry is right next to the airline industry in terms of innovation and keeping up with the pace of technology growth. Surprisingly, both are extremely slow to keep up with the new world when it comes to customer experience. Just last week this tweet popped up in my feed:

This tweet sums it all up. If you ask me, the gate of the future should not have any printer at all. We need to change the way we think about customer experience.

A month ago, I was walking home with my husband in New York and we passed through the car dealership part of Manhattan. Look at the 2018 displays today on 11th Avenue! They are pretty much the same, regardless of brand. All have plastic mannequins… I am not sure who is the target of this advertising technique. One thing is certain –  nobody born after 1980 will be converted to a customer because of it.

In the last six months, I am sure we all have at least one friend or acquaintance who has complained about the painful car buying experience. An entire industry emerged in response – companies like Shift and Carvana are the result of the notoriously bad customer experience of buying a car.

Just when I had given up on the car industry, I met the Head of Marketing and Member Services of Book by Cadillac. An innovative way of owning a vehicle, Book by Cadillac is a subscription service for luxury fleet vehicles that members can rent and swap for a month or a week. For $1,500 a month, a concierge delivers a vehicle directly to the member. The car arrives with the member’s favorite radio station tuned in and the seat in position. If the member informs the Cadillac team they are headed out of town for the weekend, they will find a picnic basket in the trunk.  Members feel a sense of freedom and convenience. Gone are the daily worries about car maintenance and insurance. Gone is the stress of owning a car. All of that is replaced with the feeling of being cared for by the car company.

Book by Cadillac is as much a great customer experience case as it is a strategic business case. A few years ago, Cadillac realized that its customer does not necessarily live in  Detroit but is more likely to live on a coast, so they moved the brand headquarters to New York. Second, the car manufacturer discovered that Millennials were not buying Cadillacs. To solve for that, the brand created Book by Cadillac, a product focused on experience vs. material product – a product that gives customers options and freedom. The strategy worked! The average age of the Book by Cadillac customer is 40 vs the overall Cadillac customer’s age of 60.

Customer experience strategy, when applied correctly, works very well. When a brand puts the customer at the center of its design and business, new customers do come. Cadillac is living proof that shifting your business model at the right time means shifting your business to the future. Take a risk and it will pay off. Follow the customer and the customer will lead you to the future!

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*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

How To Journey Map by DoingCXRight

Customer Journey Maps (Part 2)

In my recent article, I wrote about “WHAT Is Journey Mapping and WHY Do It?” Once you understand the importance, you may be wondering HOW to get started and improve your CX skills. If so, you have come to the right place. Continue Reading →

Customer Journey Map. What is it? Why Do It? (Part 1)

A customer journey map is a simple concept: it is a diagram that shows the steps customer(s) go through when interacting with a company, such as shopping online, visiting a retail store and other experiences. The need for journey maps become more important as the number of touchpoints increase and get complex. Continue reading “Customer Journey Map. What is it? Why Do It? (Part 1)”

Website Optimization and Customer Experience (CX) by Stacy Sherman

If Shoppers Can’t Proceed, They’ll Leave!

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Mobile applications have changed the way people shop and buy.  Consumers love apps for convenience and unique features, while companies benefit from the ability to easily engage with people and reward loyal customers. A great example of this is

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#CXTHUS Exchange Insights – winners and losers?

Attending conferences is a significant investment of both time and money. Even if you are speaker at the conference, like I was last week, the time away from your non-stop email flow can bring more stress than pleasure to your days. Once we reach a certain level of responsibilities, learning becomes a luxury. The key for all of us is not to let those other demands on our time stop us: there is no professional growth without learning from the successes and failures of our peers. Events like the CX Exchange Travel & Hospitality Conference make us more aware of what is going on in our industry and adjacent industries. They help us to better shift our own organizations ahead of our time.

So what did I learn from my peers at the conference?

A good expansion strategy may or may not work

TripAdvisor, the travel website that “enables travelers to unleash the full potential of every trip” reached 60% of all people who booked their travel online in the second half of 2017. TripAdvisor had a great strategy in mind – allow users to complete purchase without going to the hotel websites. Unfortunately, that strategy did not work. We are talking about this conference takeaway first, because we often overshare successes and do not talk enough about business failures. We can learn even more from our peers’ unsuccessful programs.

Conference speaker, Matthew Mamet, did not delve into exactly what went wrong at TripAdvisor, other than to explain that the hotels did not make it worthwhile to keep on TripAdvisor. You can imagine how long it took to build and launch this e-commerce experience on the travel site. Did somebody put the wrong assumptions in the financial model or did the contract with the hotels lack the proper incentives for commission? Regardless of the reason, sometimes things don’t work as planned. The best thing to do is move on and pivot as fast as possible. That is exactly what TripAdvisor is doing right now. An estimated 1 in 11 worldwide users visited TripAdvisor last July. I would not worry too much about the company. I am sure they will find another way to monetize such a powerful position.

Uber really gets it. All of it.

When Uber achieved 20% growth per month for 43 consecutive months, the company had to start from scratch with all of their processes and procedures. The innovator did not simply scale what it had (something many brands do). Instead, Uber used new technologies to reinvent itself. Uber uses machine learning to flag voice and text messages that over-index on negative sentiment, so they can pay attention to those messages and respond to them faster (read more about how Uber does this). The rideshare company uses the same technology to intercept customer care cases that are forwarded among many agents and do not fit a particular category (the ping-pong effect). Those cases are re-routed to a specialized team to handle. The AI technology also allows Uber to find a needle in a hay stack – the extreme cases in which something really bad happens to the customer. The algorithm looks for specific words early in the customer support message. When those words are there, the complaint is sent to a special care team.

COTA is the Uber in-house platform for digital agent assist that already has saved the company 9.5% – 10% of costs. Uber also does something very few brands do well. The company has a living document, a playbook. When they do something, they actually document it so other sites can replicate it. Not earth shattering in concept, but none of us does it! An important takeaway for Uber (and many of us) is that the saying about self-service – “build it and they will come” – is not working. Much more needs to be done in order to increase adoption of self-service. Many people underestimate the amount of effort and design required AFTER you launch something. Last, but definitely not least, Uber has already realized that the human agent of the future will have a completely new profile. He/she will have new skills, will come from different backgrounds and geographies, and will be paid much more. Uber’s estimate goes as high as 20% – 40% more pay. How do you fund that? With the savings from the digital agents that will be solving basic customer problems.

MGM Rocks

Before you read any further, watch MGM’s Welcome to the #SHOW ad – and pump up the sound. You will not be bored. I promise.

After the 2008 financial crisis, MGM had to find a new identity for the organization. “Welcome to the Show” is a story about the integration of 27 independent brands and the rebuilding of a company culture on the core belief that entertainment is a fundamental human need. To achieve that, MGM incentivized their executive leadership (through bonus and compensation) to travel around the world and become employee trainers on new service level standards. They made the MGM employees heroes and gave them a stage where to run their own shows. The brand is a year into this transformation so it is hard to prove results. One thing is certain though – MGM still strong and employee engagement scores are up. One lesson from MGM – stay longer at the local level when you think you are done, to ensure sustainability and reinforcement of standards. This is probably the hardest part of any hospitality program, especially with 27 resort destinations and 15 brands.

Hertz will not be in business by 2025

This may sound like an extreme prediction, but it is fairly obvious. One of the items covered at the conference was the need “to operationalize their loyalty program in the field.” What does that say to you? To me it says, our loyalty program is not working. The speaker talked about the realization that Hertz is not in the transportation business, but in the customer service industry. The conversation then became more about Hertz’s “concierge” program making “wow” experiences. I hope they have many loyalty members since it seems all efforts are channeled to those customers only.

The most alarming part was the Q&A during which the speaker said that the rideshare industry is NOT a threat to Hertz’s business. This is a classic case of not seeing the red flags as Allen Adamson writes in his great book Shift Ahead. Unless Hertz learns the importance of recognizing and acting fast on new business trends and shifts ahead soon, it will not exist in ten years.

Lessons from the CX Exchange Travel & Hospitality Conference abound. We are all returning to our offices ready to put into action what we have learned from the successes and failures of our CX colleagues.

The recording of my speaking engagement at the CX Exchange Travel & Hospitality Conference will be available for our readers on our Speaking Page in two weeks. Last, but not least, my favorite quote of the conference: “Do not confuse activity with results.”

If you like this article, please share with others so they can benefit. Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

ccxp certification test prep

Let’s Get You Certified as a CX Professional!

If you are ready to signal to the business community that you are serious about customer experience and your intention to be part of its leadership ranks, it’s time to work on earning your internationally recognized Certified Customer Experience Professional certification.

Doing so makes you a part of an elite group of certified CX professionals who lead the way in customer experience innovation and action.

The Basics of the Certified Customer Experience Professional (CCXP) Certification Continue reading “Let’s Get You Certified as a CX Professional!”

User Experience Matters by Stacy Sherman

User Experience Matters

The number of digital buyers continues to rise every year.  “In 2017, an estimated 1.66 billion people worldwide purchased goods online. During the same year, global e-retail sales amounted to 2.3 trillion U.S. dollars, and projections show growth of up to 4.48 Continue reading “User Experience Matters”

customer experience applications for ai

How Well Do You Understand AI Applications?

Last week I spoke about AI at the Argyle Forum webinar and at the ConnectID Conference in Washington, DC. Technology is emerging and we need to find a way to integrate it. In order to get approval for AI initiatives from our CFOs and/or boards and to get AI adopted by our customers, it must meet a specific customer experience need or fill in a journey gap.

As Jessica Groopman summarizes, AI can be broken into 3 major streams: big data, vision and language. These streams come with various applications that have clear business cases that we can learn from.

AI Big Data Application

Ancestry uses big data to explore DNA and compare it to hundreds of thousands of records it already has in its database to provide customers with insight about your genetics origin. Even my genetics specialist suggested last week that my husband and I check our ancestry there. Information is power, and knowing more about who we are and where we come from is a big gap in our journeys as individuals. Ancestry utilizes big data and creates a product and a customer experience that makes sense to the end user.  This is why their product is being adopted by customers.

AI Language Application

At Waverly Labs  Andrew Ochoa and his team are using machine translation to break down language barriers around the world. With an ear piece and an app, users can travel anywhere in the world and hold a real-time conversation with locals without learning the language of the country they are visiting. That is real game changer in communications. Imagine finally having a real conversation with your waiter in a small French bed and breakfast and ordering the best local dish. Or speaking to your mother or father-in-law without having to learn the mother tongue of your spouse (although understanding each other better could deteriorate that in-law relationship :)). These real customer experience gaps drove 22K people to fund Waverly Labs on IndieGogo and helped Andrew Ochoa raise $4.5M.

AI Vision Application

Facial recognition is one of the most common applications of vision AI. Yesterday at the ConnectID Conference we saw a variety of trials that prove the use of facial recognition at the airport to enhance efficiency and security for the customer and his/her journey. Airlines and airports all over the world are working on refining the value proposition of these deployments with the seamless biometrically enabled journey as the end goal.

Last year we wrote about eBay and their big bet to make AI the center of their product design. E-Bay is building the ultimate personalization, making it possible to design an outfit that does not exist!  We are all learning, but one thing is certain, chatbots are not the only application in AI and if you are a competitive customer experience professional, you better learn all the answers AI has to offer before you find yourself with a stupid chatbot in your contact center while  your competitor used AI to reimagine the customer experience, embracing a technology that drives them straight into the future.

If you like this article, please share with others so they can benefit. Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

eCommerce and Customer Experience

E-commerce and Doing CX Right

Not too long ago, consumers had to drive to a retail store in order to buy and get a new product or service.  The launch of E-commerce has significantly improved shopper experiences offering more convenience, time savings, expanded product choices Continue reading “E-commerce and Doing CX Right”

time tips for cx experts

CX and the Gift of Time

Time is the most precious gift in life. If you think about it, time is the one thing we all want more of. As we get older and busier, time gets even more valuable to us.  Continue reading “CX and the Gift of Time”

"Companies Need To Focus On Holistic CX Rather Than Tactical CX"

​How To Take CX To A New Level

Many companies strive to achieve high customer satisfaction scores but end up falling short of their goals. One reason is that business teams focus on single parts of the customer journey instead of taking a Continue reading “​How To Take CX To A New Level”

CX Skills Builder: How to articulate your CX Value and secure your budget

Two weeks ago we urged you to find CX problems and fix them instead of diagnosing and mapping them. That is  Continue reading “CX Skills Builder: How to articulate your CX Value and secure your budget”

Expert interviews About Doing CX Right

Expert Interviews on DoingCXRight

One of the reasons we launched our blog is to build a community of people who are passionate about Learning and DoingCXRight. While we have been writing articles weekly from our perspective, as we “live and breathe” CX in our jobs every day at Verizon and JetBlue, we know there is tremendous value in hearing other professional views too. That is why we are excited to announce the upcoming launch of CXCoffeeTalk, where we will feature interviews with CX professionals and Customer Experience authors across different industries. They will share expertise on important topics such as:

  • Where should CX sit in an organization?
  • What are essential customer experience skills for a career in CX?
  • What are the ideal ways to measure CX?
  • And more on how to do CXRight.

Don’t miss out on valuable knowledge sharing. Sign up to get updates on our official launch of CXCoffeeTalk as well as receive ongoing ‘How To’ tips on DoingCXRight delivered to your email inbox.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

customer experience skills builder

CX Skills Builders: You May Have a CX Job and Not Know It

Last week we talked about the identity crisis of CX professionals and we urged you to fix any small problem or seam on the customer journey in order to build internal brand equity and buy in. Often, there is another scenario that is equally sub-optimal for your career development. You might be working on customer experience without recognizing it. The trouble with that is that you cannot sell your transferable skills when you don’t know that you have them. Continue reading “CX Skills Builders: You May Have a CX Job and Not Know It”

CX Skills Builder: Own the Customer Experience

Often, CX professionals do not believe they impact CX design and experience for their customers. Why?  What is the cause of this disconnect?

A month ago, I got a call from an acquaintance saying that her mom got the loyalty points for flying to her destination on an airline carrier, but not coming back. When she called the carrier, the person on the phone told her that since the booking was not made via the airline website, they could not find her reservation and help her.

Who is responsible for this bad customer experience?  More importantly, who has the power, skills and authority to fix it? The answer is easy. All. Of. Us.  Who do customers perceive as the person responsible to fix their customer experience problems? The Customer Experience Director.  I realized this, pointedly, when my acquaintance reached out to me.

In this example, typical of airline industry providers, it is true that we cannot find a reservation that has been made on another channel. It is true that our systems can be better integrated, more CRM-enabled, and easier to work with. It is also true that despite existing limitations, many professionals across the organization can do something to improve the customer experience in a case like this one.

The person on the phone can come up with a creative way to find the customer reservation using another tool.  The person in charge of partnerships can work on a better integration with other booking channels.  The person managing the points tool can enhance the tool so that every customer shows the last 2 flights, regardless of where that customer booked those flights. The list of can-dos and should-dos goes on and on. Yet, these customer experience professionals do not see themselves as owning the customer experience, nor do they feel accountable to do something to improve the customer experience.

To change that, it is imperative to shift the culture in the mindset of customer experience professionals at all levels.  This is very difficult to do.

Even the CX professionals who own the customer experience on paper frequently do not feel empowered to have a real impact. They do not recognize that something as simple as the example above can become a successful project in their portfolio. Instead, customer experience professionals journey map and look at holistic pictures, often without implementing or designing for real changes to the customer experience.

It almost feels like CX professionals have an identity crisis that prevents them from acting with impact. This may be because some are afraid of angering the operation, and so take a more passive approach. A passive approach does not advance the cause of customer experience design, nor does it make it easier to make real changes and to be heard at the table next time. Customer Experience professionals need a portfolio of changes to gain legitimacy in their organizations.  The best way to do that is to find a seam in the experience and fix problems. No matter how small a problem may be, fix it. Don’t just document it, communicate it and assess it. Fix it!

It is okay to jump in and fix the customer experience because this IS your job as a CX professional. At the end of the day, if you are not fixing things you really aren’t  doing your job. Own the customer experience. Be Brave. And you will see how much your internal brand will grow, and you will watch the operation start to come to you for solutions they know will work.

Like this tip? Sign up to have our next Own the Customer Experience CX Pro Tip delivered straight to your Inbox.

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

 

TpysRUs bankruptcy why

Do You Know Why The Iconic Brand Toys ‘R’ Us Closed Doors Despite All Our Memories? #RetailBlues

The year is 2016. You are the CEO of Toys ‘R’ Us. Your brand still controls 13.6% of the toy market although the company is highly leveraged, a strategy of your private equity investors. Amazon has its best ever holiday season and digital commerce is becoming the way customers purchase consumer goods more and more. You also have read about the epic miss of Kodak to move to digital photography. Last but not least, you have observed other retailers invest in their websites and build e-commerce customer experiences in an effort to avoid a “Kodak moment.” What do you do?

Nothing new, is the answer, and bankruptcy is the outcome that we are all reading about this week.

Sometimes, the ROI of the CX business case is survival. Literally. If Toys ‘R’ Us had listened to its customers and had build a digital experience on their website, the historic brand of our childhood would have become part of the childhood of our children. It is not easy for a brick and mortar business to reinvent itself into a digital business. It is not impossible. To survive, companies must evolve with their customers or die. The survival of the fittest in full effect on the business landscape, especially in retail.

Every organization has capital funds to invest in big bets (or not). Disruptive technologies today are redefining our way of life and the way that we consume goods and services. Big brands today need to ensure their boards and executive teams are made of bold, visionary leaders who are not afraid to recognize the future when the future is coming their way, and to invest in righting their ship on time. The leaders of Toys ‘R” Us were not aggressive enough until the end. This navigated the brand into oblivion.

Another 2016 scenario for Toys ‘R’ Us could have been to focus its remaining funding into a digital transformation, to build an interactive website and a user friendly app. The stores could have become places for customers to interact with the toys and order them on apps on their own devices, or on iPads in the store.

Toys ‘R’ Us could have built an interactive loyalty program following the growth cycle of the children who received toys from their stores. I have a Toys ‘R’ Us loyalty card and for the last 5 years I have not received a single communication from the brand about its loyalty program. No coupons, benefits or programming of any sort.

I do not know what Toys ‘R’ Us has invested in, in the past 5 years. One thing is evident. The brand did not have an aggressive digital strategy and vision to stay relevant in today’s world. A better management team would have never let this happen…while they were buying their new smart phones with more and more apps and digital products on them every year.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

customer experience

CX Lessons From My Experience At The Apple Store

As discussed in “Make It Easy To Get Help,” it’s essential that companies focus on creating great experiences not just at the beginning of their buying journey but post-purchase too. Customers often need support in setting up and using a new product Continue reading “CX Lessons From My Experience At The Apple Store”

How to Prepare for AI: Dispatches from CR Summit, Charleston

On the eve of the #CRSummit in Charleston, customer experience leaders from various industries held the first AI Committee meeting. AI is a challenging topic to cover since it has varied customer experience applications depending on a brand’s growth cycle, customer base and business challenges. Companies like eBay place big bets on AI, while others use natural language processing (AI) only to build smart chatbots.

Regardless of their approaches all companies have one thing in common – they all need to prepare for AI implementation by having a comprehensive data strategy with flexible architecture and a lot of storage. This is the missing piece for most companies. Organizations have different reasons for lacking intelligent data. Some brands are too young and have homegrown systems that need major overhauls to even scale for the growth of the companies. Others have more robust data repositories, but have been built without the customer as the common unit.

There is a third scenario: companies that have third party CRM systems that also host the data. This makes it almost impossible to have the end-to-end data to use for building personalized experiences. It is important to learn the necessary foundations so when you meet with sales reps you can recognize the option that will fit your technology needs.

Another foundational and somewhat counter-intuitive aspect of applying AI is the need for humans. The biggest misconception about AI is that it will “remove jobs”. Meanwhile, customer experience leaders are all struggling to persuade CFOs to fund new teams of data scientists, people who would tag existing data, or people who watch for the “triggers” to use the data. Once this is done, brands will need data councils to add new elements or to design new uses of AI. Companies will always need more people to manage AI effectively.

Lastly, we all want to build solutions that will save operating costs today and enable a future customer experience transformation. So when we build, we need to think about scaling and building further, with the customer at the center.

There are still questions we need to answer. How do we begin the process (especially without much funding)? How can we make AI a reality and not just talk about it? What are the tradeoffs (if any) that we will have to make in the process?

Stay tuned for the next post on AI.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Where Should CX Sit at the Table?

Before we begin talking about where CX should sit in the organization, I want to clarify one thing. Customer Experience is not a single person. 

A company cannot hire one customer experience professional and expect that in a year that company will have a customer-centric corporate culture in place. CX also is not a team that has no visibility and no budget. No one has ever heard of a business successful transformation without extensive change management implications done and without vision and strategy. CX requires individuals and teams with cross functional workshops, new products and processes and heavy communications across the organization.

A CX team needs the leadership support to deliver all of those to the brand and the organization. So where in the organization should CX sit? Leadership teams across industries and geographies are trying different suboptimal approaches.

IT

Last year a non-profit health insurance company in New York approached me to ask for feedback on their CX set up. They were planning to set the CX team under the CIO. Since the corporate staff was not big, the role of CX would have been fairly elevated. Still, I advised against that organizational structure.

A customer experience transformation cannot be led by IT for several reasons. Although the world today is more and more digital, brands still are in the business of making the human, long lasting connection with the customers that will drive more sales. Our IT partners are excellent at executing a program and can definitely help with the UX part of the job, but they are not marketers or operators.  Asking IT to drive CX is just not the right choice. There is no doubt that CX cannot exist without IT. But that does not mean IT needs to lead it.

Marketing

Marketing (or in some organizations “product”) is the most common set up for CX in brands’ corporate organizations. Media and consumer goods companies usually take this approach.  At first look it makes sense to set CX in marketing. After all the purpose of CX is to deliver on the brand promises made by marketing.

This could almost work if brands did not bury my CX peers deep down in the organization so they turn into journey mapping documentation gatherers with no real impact. One fast food brand in Europe actually had the role of Head of Brand Engagement under the CMO and then had four other leaders reporting to that role, one of which was the CX Director. That CX Director was competing with the other three directors with similar roles for a piece of the authority pie.  This is equivalent to giving somebody a problem to solve with no tools to do so.

HR

One Financial Services institution in the US had arguably the least impactful set up. They actually put CX under HR! Please, do not mix customer experience with HR. I know that we all talk about the importance of employee engagement to the successful delivery of exceptional brand experiences. Although happy employees and customer-centric culture are requirements for a CX driven organization, CX is much more than that.

For a CX group to have impact and drive change, it needs to be in the customer facing part of the organization. The CX professionals need access to the customer to learn what is working and what is not. They need access to the operations to change processes and procedures. Lastly, CX professionals need tools like IT and Marketing to deliver new solutions and communicate those solutions to the customer. HR offers none of those enablers to a CX transformation.

Customer Experience

An organization that is really committed to putting the customer at its center will build (reorg) the governance structure to reflect that commitment. That means having a Customer Experience Executive that has all the customer facing divisions under him/her and funding this organization appropriately.

If that means taking funding from other parts of the organization, so be it. As a brand this signals to both the investors and the employees that a real shift of the corporate mindset is taking place. With that set up, customers also will feel the change and will reciprocate with their loyalty. To do CX right, that is the way to do it – not by hiring one person buried in the org with no seat at the table, just to check off a mark.

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Autonomous Customers, Traveler Privacy and More Questions for CX Professionals in a Changing World

“As we move toward a more automated culture, most travelers will adapt to a Jetsonian, automated lifestyle.  Every industry we know will be disrupted.  For those of us in aviation, this signals the shift from aviation as a service industry to a transactional one that is potentially devoid of the personal touches that made the romance of flight an event.”

As I am boarding my flight to Denver today to speak at the AAAE Conference on “Autonomous Airports,” I can’t help but question, what does autonomous airport really mean.  The customer experience value of an airport itself is not autonomous.  Rather, the emerging autonomous airport experience aims to give birth to, enable and empower autonomous customers.

That brings about even more questions for CX professionals, particular customer experience professionals in the aviation world.

What is an autonomous customer?

The autonomous customer uses his/her time better and has more of it. Today we have a “holding room” at airport gates. Holding room… even the term itself sounds limiting.

What is a customer supposed to do in a holding room?  Be on hold?

Autonomous airports are open spaces with no physical or process boundaries between the individual customer touch points (check-in, bag drop, etc.).  As a result, there also is no barrier between crewmember and customer. Eliminating barriers in autonomous airports shifts the power from the airport procedures and processes to the traveler. This makes travel more enjoyable.

Because of this customer experience-driven design, the autonomous customer can go through the experience at his/her own pace.  The autonomous customer is not “held” anywhere. The airport becomes a menu of tools and services that the autonomous customer is empowered to choose to use or not. Who would not want to do that?

What about Grandma’s journey?

Autonomous airports enable both customers and crewmembers. A roving crew has access to much more information and tools on the go that enable them to take care of the needs of all customers of all ages, particularly those who do not want to or are unable to do so themselves.

Maybe the first time, Grandma will be intimidated (although not all grandmas are alike!) by the autonomous airport environment, but she will quickly get used to and appreciate the self-driving device that can whisk her and her bags from one gate to another in a few minutes.

What about my privacy? Does autonomy mean my airline knows everything about me?

Autonomy is also about accountability.  On both sides. Customers want information and adequate services at the right times.  It is impossible for any brand to deliver that without access to certain customer information or preferences.

Customers also want seamless journeys across the airport. To design that airlines and airports need access to certain customer history. For example, if you want the airline to wait for the customer one extra minute at the gate, the airline needs to know that the customer is physically at the airport. Even more so, the airline should know whether the customer has passed security already.

In the case of JetBlue’s autonomous airport CX design, Bag Buddy, one of my ideas, was designed to pick up customer bags at their homes and transport them directly to their destinations. That seamless movement of objects and people lays on the foundations of data sharing. More specifically, it rests on good data that is appropriate and useful in delivering the experience customers want.

Questions remain, and as CX experts continue to design autonomous airports and meet the needs of the autonomous customer, new questions will arise.  For now, let me demystify the autonomous airport for you. At the heart of the autonomous airport, from the CX perspective, is the information that will allow the airport as a physical asset to expand its boundaries and reach people’s homes. Data allows physical boundaries to merge and creates one big experience of transporting people and their belongings across space. That is a future we all want, Jetsons fans or not.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

CX Design – Make the Customer Know Who You Are

Now that we have helped you become experts in the design of space and function and the design of feelings, it is time to turn our attention to aesthetics, and to connect customer experience to brand identity.

T5 is an expression of the JetBlue brand. When customers enter the space, they feel and know that they are flying JetBlue and not another airline. How can you make customers know, without a doubt, that they are experiencing your brand?

Know your brand!

At first pass, the direction to know your brand is self-explanatory, but you would be surprised by how many CX professionals believe that only the marketing department needs to know brand identity.

In today’s digital and mobile world, every member of a company must know the brand. Without a deep understanding of the brand you represent, you are a blind painter. How can you even begin to express brand values and beliefs that you do not know and understand? Know your brand. If you don’t, find a way to learn it! Now.

Convince your CFO that brand equity funding is a long term investment

If many people do not know the brands they work for, even fewer fail to understand the fragile nature of brand equity. If you go to your CFO tomorrow and ask for funding to “infuse the brand” in whatever physical or digital experience you are building, you will be asked for the ROI on this undertaking. You will also be told that it feels like this “brand stuff” is a “nice to have,” not a “must have” feature.

If there is one moment when you can self-destruct the business case of Customer Experience, it is the moment you agree with this statement. The right answer is “Investment in the brand side of customer experience is a must-have feature because without reinvestment in the brand equity, the customer will not connect the experience you have built with the brand you represent.”

Treat your brand with the same empathy you treat your employees and customers

If your brand is strong, it has personality. If it has personality, you can treat your brand as a person – with empathy and care. JetBlue’s persona is smart, fresh and stylish. As the CX designer, I translate this to edgy and innovative, taking a modern view – chic and modern, regardless of time. What does that mean during the design phase? Obsession over every detail.

Details make the customer experience memorable and unique. Nothing is too small for the CX designer to touch. The kiosks in T5 are slim, white and without the “catcher” boarding passes. Brand-driven decisions and compromises made this happen. Crewmembers would have preferred wider kiosks to lay down their cups of coffee. They also would have preferred another color that does not require as much cleaning. Customers would have preferred the metal, functional and protruding catcher for the boarding passes.  The brand persona did not fit with any of those functional needs, so they are not in the lobby today.

Without attention to details, the look and feel of the T5 lobby would not have screamed JetBlue the way it does now. By respecting the brand identity, the design came out sleek. Customers tweeted praise for the design, comparing it to Apple.

Location, location, location

How the customer experience touch points are sequenced can also express brand identity. JetBlue is “nice.” Flying with JetBlue is a “nice experience.” The airline is “human and comfortable.” So when the decision was made to invest in custom-made repack stations with integrated scales, we took brand identity into consideration. The table could have been made more cheaply out of metal. But that would not have made the experience “nice.”

Instead, customers would have felt like they were in a factory, or like they were in surgery. The tables also were conveniently built in close proximity to the new real “Bag Drop” in order to make it more comfortable for customers to move between the two touch points.

Customer experience professionals must be the loudest brand ambassadors and brand managers. CX professionals deliver on the promises brand marketers communicate in their campaigns. Without this link, and without that collaboration, customer experience feels disconnected, at best.

As a customer experience professional, you must own the brand equally to the marketers and serve the brand’s values. If you fail to do that, you are delivering a customer experience that has no soul, and you are missing the opportunity to build a deep, meaningful, memorable connection with the customer – the ultimate goal of every brand.

Image courtesy as featured in Cosmopolitan Magazine

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Delight Customers Without Strings Attached​

Most people enjoy receiving gifts on their birthdays. They get a sense of joy when their favorite brands give them monetary awards. It is a smart business strategy that builds brand loyalty but only if done authentically and without requiring customer actions Continue reading “Delight Customers Without Strings Attached​”

CX design brand goals JetBlue Liliana Petrova CX

CX Design – How Do You Want Customers To Feel?

Last week, we talked about CX Design in terms of space and function. Today, we continue our CX design journey to talk about the design of emotions and feelings. The new look of the JetBlue T5 lobby created customer experience interactions in more open spaces for the benefit of both customers and crewmembers.
The next element of the design, connecting to the feelings of customers, drives that make-or-break goal, ROI. While designing for a customer’s feelings is critically important, it is often overlooked.  Meeting the functional needs of customers is only the base of the experience pyramid. Most brands stop there. They believe that meeting those basic functional customer needs is enough to deliver great customer experience. It is not. In his book Outside In, Harley Manning revisits the three levels of the CX Pyramid: “meet needs,” “easy,” “enjoyable.”
To design great customer experience like we did with the T5 project, we jump right to the top of the pyramid, working on making our customers say “I feel [blank] about this experience.” How you fill in that blank depends on your brand and culture values.

 

How do you want customers to feel?

It is important to think through the emotions you are designing, since those emotions will trigger repeat business. As Maya Angelou said “…people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
That memory of a feeling is both a risk and an opportunity to create a long lasting relationship with your customers. When we were designing the lobbies, the customer experience team wanted our customers to feel efficient, taken care of, empowered and smart enough to do things themselves without help. We knew the goal: create simple, personal and helpful customer experience. All we had to do was think about what that meant in terms of emotion.

Manage Change 

How big is the change you are introducing? Are you adding enough new customer experience elements to compensate for the discomfort of those you are removing?
 

Start with change management. When we removed the podiums from the lobby, we essentially took away our crewmembers’ comfort zone – their anchor, their place to hold personal items. This change was disruptive to their daily lives. It was important that, as we took away tools, we also gave crewmembers new tools to make them feel heard and understood. So we designed a hospitality training, a CX soft training with standards and tips on how to interact with customers and keep the brand promises we made.

With the hospitality training, JetBlue crewmembers had the cultural/brand guidelines of service delivery that perfectly complemented the new space we built. One of the 5 Whys informed us that the only thing a “Bag Drop” position should do is check IDs and scan boarding passes and bag tags. Podiums and computers were replaced with Blackberries to do just that, and the transaction times at Bag Drop dropped in half.  Customers spent 30 seconds dropping their bags and continuing on their (CX) journey. The lines disappeared. The negative comments about long lines in our VOC surveys also disappeared. We had a drop of 65% of any mention of “long queues”.
 

Does your corporate culture support the internal disruption you are creating?

Since we completely disrupted our crewmembers’ work space, we needed to think about the soft side of this innovation. At the time, we were the first airline in North America to remove podiums at Bag Drop. This is where JetBlue’s culture is a true differentiator. The CX design did not stop with the Ccustomer. It included the crewmember.
We treated our employees as customers.
We spent equal time deliberating how to design (and pay for) the new Bag Drop positions to minimize the functional changes in the lives our crewmembers. For example, where would they leave their phones, purses, wallets, when they worked? We built drawers in the blue arcs above the intake bag belts to meet that need. The thinner design better matched the overall open space approach of the lobbies. Despite that, we built them thicker, making the trade-off between brand look and function to manage the customer experience of our crewmembers and their acceptance of change.
The design of exceptional (and memorable) customer experience requires empathy. To connect to your customer, you need to go beyond meeting the customer’s functional needs. Making an experience like this easy for customers is very hard for CX professionals. There is no doubt about that. But ease only connects with the rational side of your customers. To generate more ROI through CX, you need to also create a positive emotion that will trigger the irrational decisions to (hopefully) pay for your product or service at a premium next time.
They will come back to you, even at a higher price, not only because they had a seamless customer experience, but because they want to relive the feeling you gave them. You will be one of the few brands that is not just offering a product or a service.  You are offering amazing customer experience – you are a well oiled machine for feelings.
 
Image courtesy of JetBlue
*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Why I Don’t Love Chat Bots

Today, we tackle the value proposition that chat bots are more valuable to companies than customers. I reject this.  The ROI simply is not there, especially since better customer experience is not there. I have experienced both fully automated bots and “augmented” service agents interactions using the chat channel, and neither delivers on the promises of chat bots as the game-changing resource we all need.

For our blog we use a photography subscription service. They push chat support heavily. When I used it, it was slow. The person either did not know English well enough or was multi-tasking several chats, but it felt like he was not present. On occasion, it felt like he was not answering the question I was asking, but rather providing a generic response. The base for effective communication is connection. When I felt unheard by the “support,” my frustration almost led me to drop the service (there are plenty of options for photography sources). Suddenly the chat offering threatens to cause the loss of a customer… and the organization PAID for it, for its integration, monthly support fees etc. I do not like that. It makes no sense.

empathetic response ai photos

AI presentation photo by Liliana Petrova, CCXP

Let’s talk about the fully automated chat bots. Allegedly, this is where companies see the real efficiencies. Again, no real value for customers unless the automated chat function allows them to fully self-serve. The problem is, the fully automated chat bot today is stupid. It can perform only very distinct functions.

The customer faced with a chat immediately tenses up with anxiety. He/she knows that the chances are pretty high he/she will have to channel switch pretty soon. How many bot interactions have you had that allowed you to solve your problem without switching to a human? Chat bot is supposed to deliver customer-centric experience. It is supposed to be customer directed, but the customer feels anxious that the minute the bot gets “stupid,” the customer loses control of the experience. Suddenly, the power is with the bot.

What is the future for chat bots? Disturbing is a word that comes to mind. Soul Machines is the company to check for the preview. They have developed a digital human that has a BRAIN built on a virtual nervous system. Now that is equally exciting and terrifying. It reminds me of the AI empowered female voice that sounds like a human one (the digital human is also female…just saying). It will take some time before the digital human agent becomes the norm, but one thing is for sure, the next version of “stupid bot” will have empathy.

According to Forrester, 60% of us prefer not to use a chat bot at all. I bet you if you ask why, you will also hear that the bots just stupid. So how can chat bots become smarter? We are back to the data conversation. Chat bots are as smart as the power and scope of the underlying data they can pull/learn from. In the case of the JetBlue customer experience team, without an integration to our reservation system, the chat bot cannot change or re-book a passenger’s ticket. Until then. customers will keep reading “please speak to an agent.” That is hardly a way to feel the love.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

CX Design Makes Form and Function Beautiful – and Cosmopolitan Magazine Notices

At its core, design is about value creation. In the world of Customer Experience, value-driven design requires CX professionals to use empathy to imagine a future customer experience that is easy, fast, and seamless.
The specific CX design can be building a new lobby, changing an existing customer-facing process that takes too long, or simplifying an internal procedure that prevents employees from solving customers’ problems quickly. Due to its importance, CX design is also one of the six disciplines that the CCXP Exam covers. Every CX professional must feel accountable and responsible for CX design. It is our job to design customer-centric experiences and to prove the ROI of that design.
All of this can feel overwhelming. How can one person solve all of these structural problems in a creative way? Where do you even begin?
 

What do you want the customer to do?

Begin with the process. Look at the current process, envision the future process, and identify the gaps. In the case of the JetBlue lobby, before we even began building T5, we met with industrial engineers to go over the mechanics of the space. Our objective: “We want movement. No queues.” Airports and airlines share that goal. But it is too generic a statement to foster an immediate design solution.
 
Answer the following questions at this first phase of the CX design process: “Why is there no movement today? Why are people waiting on line?” 
Next, use the 5 whys technique to really understand what to address in your design (in the case of the lobby, we looked at what we needed to do to create movement). In order to create the customer-centric design to meet the “create movement” goal, we needed to address a number of existing issues. There were long lines at the “Bag Drop” position. And, often, the Express Bag Drop line was even longer than the Full Service line that offered more services. All of this left customers and crewmembers feeling frustrated.
 
Photo: JetBlue

Design Solves Problems by Meeting Needs

The original plan to address the bad customer experience was to introduce self-tagging kiosks in the lobby. The thought was, if customers could print their own bag tags, the lines would disappear. At first look, this sounded logical. 
But then, we all remembered the great book “The Goal” . The Goal teaches to look for the bottleneck of any operation and to chase it all the way down/out of the system. Instead of building the business case only for kiosks, I kept thinking about the end-to-end journey of the customer. Not surprisingly, when we asked our 5 Whys, we quickly found the root cause that we needed to solve with the future CX design.
Kiosks were not enough. We had to go farther.
We never truly had Bag Drop positions. Functionally, there was nothing different between the Bag Drop position and the Full Service position. Customers would go to the fast lane and clog it with questions or needs that required crewmembers to act as a full service desk, holding the line for up to 15 minutes per customer.
As a CX Designer, we solved that by stripping the full service functionality from the Bag Drop position. We removed the computers to signal to customers that those positions have limited abilities to assist. As it turned out, this was not enough. Customers still expected to get the “Full Service” experience at Bag Drop.  

Use Design to Change Behavior

We responded by removing the physical barrier between the customer and the crewmemeber –  the podiums.  The result was a completely different environment for crewmembers to operate in. We not only disabled them from ever functioning again as full service desks, we also SHOWED the customers that these are different positions. In so doing, we made customers behave differently through design.
Featured in Cosmopolitan Magazine, the new design empowered them to deliver a personal, helpful and simple experience by removing the physical barrier between the crewmembers and the customers. In the end, this created an open environment that ignites conversations.
 
Creative thinking, process mindset and empathy are the key ingredients to building CX journeys that differentiate your business and make your customers come back for more. People do exactly what you design them to do. The good news is, as the customer experience designer, you are in charge. There is no such thing as overthinking design. Keep imagining all the things that can go wrong and then amend your design accordingly. Enjoy the art of CX design!
 
Featured Image Courtesy of Cosmopolitan Magazine
Get more tips on CX Design and CX career questions through our DoingCXRight Mentor Program.
*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

The End Of The Customer Journey Matters Just As Much As The Beginning

Many companies spend a lot of time and budget on acquiring new customers. They focus on driving satisfaction in the early stages of the journey (Learn & Buy) and ignore customer experiences and sentiments once payment is received. This is often the case for Continue reading “The End Of The Customer Journey Matters Just As Much As The Beginning”

How to Sell the C-Suite on Customer Experience

You finally got your big career break and you are leading a project that requires executive approval. Now what? Intuitively you know that this is a chance to make a first impression on the right people, but you have no idea how to approach this process. There is no set procedure and your leader can be good or bad at this, so going to your boss might not be the first right step. Where do you begin?

Overcommunicate – Know your audience

Begin by scheduling pre-briefings with each individual executive. Do not forget the Chief Counsel or the Chief HR Executive. When it comes to the Exec Crew, every function weighs equally. You never know who might help (or block) your business case. If you are asking for millions of dollars to build CX expertise in the enterprise, or to finally connect underlying systems that yield bad customer experience, you might find that the Chief HR executive is so passionate about customer experience that he/she is the loudest voice in the room.

Your job does not end here. You also need to assess the political capital of each executive. Who has been on the team the longest? Who has the strongest ties to the Board of Directors? The networking power of leaders can be stronger than the hierarchy of power.  It is invisible, but it cannot be underestimated.

Nothing is decided in the executive meeting/board room

The moment you realize this you will increase your success of obtaining funding for CX initiatives. You also will realize how much more work you have ahead of you to put the CX roadmap on your organization’s priority list.

The executive meeting is the ink meeting. It is the show. The real approvals and conversations that you need take place before that meeting. If these conversations do not take place, nothing gets approved. Many times, I have peers bring business cases to the executive committee without “pre-socializing” them. In the meeting, they are asked various business and political questions that they are unable to answer and nothing gets accomplished. The best case scenario is to get that approval “pushed” to the next meeting. One thing is for sure: no money or support is gained that day.

Cover all your bases

Never underestimate the power of the VPs and Directors. If you think you only need to sell CX to an executive to introduce the customer as a mindset, you are very wrong. The first thing a good Executive does is turn to his VPs and Directors and say “What do you think about this?” If you have not sold your agenda to them, the conversation is over.

Think of this work as an election campaign. Assess the benefits of each stakeholder or group in your organization. If there are losers in the landscape who, by design, will hurt, you need to acknowledge that every chance you get, in public. And you must thank them for sacrificing themselves for the greater good.

Have the keys to the gate

The Executive Assistants must be your friends. All. of. them. I know it is basic, but somehow, people still fail to follow this principle. Access is everything. Without it you have no voice, no audience. Take care of them every holiday season. Even without an occasion. Just do it.

Getting executive buy-in is not easy, but it is not an impossible task. Remember: think like a CX expert, know your Customer, personalize your message, and express empathy when you deliver your pitch. People want the same things, regardless of the setting – to be heard, considered and respected. Remember this, and design your approach accordingly.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Brand Image ROI

Two weeks ago we discussed the power of employee engagement for your brand and the true meaning and ROI of a working corporate culture. Today we will examine the business case of the engaged customer, the powerful brand image and the brand loyalty it generates – loyalty that drives repeat purchases, higher revenues and more engaged customers.
 
An engaged customer requires the investment of the ongoing conversation. The “conversation” dollars go to social media campaigns, closed-loop systems for customer feedback, and a responsive loyalty customer service, among other customer experience levers.
 
Invest in people as much as product
 
Two weeks ago, I received a complaint from a JetBlue customer. In order to keep the conversation going with this customer, I had to relay the information to the teams that were accountable for his experience and get back to him with a comprehensive and empathetic feedback about his experience. CX professionals call this close loop, but close loop is a policy. My taking the effort to connect with people across the organization and CARING to get answers is employee engagement on my part, and that is generated by our corporate culture.
 
This culture is what maintains customer engagement and, which, as a result will create an ancillary purchase in the future. Often, people and service are more important than the product of an organization.  People and service build an organization’s brand image when customers interact with the brand. Customer experience relies more on human interactions with the brand than on the technology that enables those interactions.
 
Empathy and Innovation
 
Magazine Luiza is another great example of impacting ancillary sales and seeing a 35% ROI as a result of deliberate investment in empathy and innovation.  The Brazilian virtual store offers products on credit to the under-served customers in rural areas. Customers can see pictures of their desired products then go home and wait for the delivery in the next 48 hours.
 
To achieve loyalty and repeat business, Magazine Luiza also functions as community centers that offer free internet, literacy, cooking and basic banking classes. This investment contributed to the build out of a strong emotional connection between the brand and its audience, transforming Magazine Luiza into a powerful lifestyle brand to its customers. Even customers apprehensive of taking credit visit a place where a friendly face walks them through the experience of borrowing money while their child learns how to write for free.
 
The brand image of growth and development that come from the education components Magazine Luiza provides is, in a way, transferred to the “product” of buying on credit.  Once customers are empowered to buy on credit initially, they return to buy more things because each of those purchases makes them feel economically empowered.
 
Engaged customers are the blood of every business
 
Without engaged customers, business cannot grow. They provide the steady cashflow and the free cashflow that allow a business to invest in products and customer acquisition. The ROI of engaged customers lies in the growth of the organization and the incremental revenue that ensues. Depending on the growth stage of a particular organization, that ROI also can mean an organization’s survival.
*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.
the customer experience effect jetblue liliana petrova

How Do You Know You Are Making The Right Big Bet?

In the last post for JetBlue’s Into the Blue blog series on customer experience lessons learned in 2017, Liliana Petrova and her guests explore different ways to envision the future so you can build it effectively.

“Don’t tie it to technology, tie it to an aspiration.” is the advice of Allegra Burnette, former Forrester consultant.

Liliana’s and JetBlue’s leap into the unknown is using micro-innovation and empathy to create consistent memorable experiences for the customer at every possible interaction while keeping in mind their true North Star.

Read more and watch the video.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

DoingCXRight

How To Turn Mistakes Into Positive Customer Experiences

No company is perfect. It is inevitable that employees will make mistakes. The impact on brand image is not necessarily related to WHAT happens as much as HOW employees handle a problem. I recently encountered a situation, which in the end Continue reading “How To Turn Mistakes Into Positive Customer Experiences”

Culture Is King – The Power Of Employee Engagement

In 2017 we introduced our ROI series recognizing the challenges all customer experience professionals have to obtain funding for CX initiatives and to prove their positive returns. Our second ROI post covered how a well built customer experience can increase revenue and customer growth of your organization. Today we will walk you through the positive impact customer experience has on employee engagement.
 
Great Culture is the Enabler of Great Service
 
Excellent corporate culture creates engaged employees who are proud of their company and make it a personal mission to deliver great experiences. Engaged employees love the brand they work for so much that they will go above and beyond to “convince” their customers to feel the same way. Actions like this transform employees from brand ambassadors to brand builders. When leadership takes the time to build and maintain an engaged workforce the impact is significant, and profitable.
 
Yet, if culture is of such high value to organizations, why do so few succeed in creating this kind of customer experience advantage for their organizations? Because it is hard, and expensive.
 
Let’s say your cultural values have FUN in them. How do people live that value at work? They celebrate holidays with social events, they go on interesting off-sites, they  have fun contests in the operation, etc. Each of these cultural artifacts of the fun value costs money. Most leaders will say they believe in the fun value; very few will approve the expenses for the discreet activities that maintain that value.  When companies grow, all those activities include the added expenses of travel in order to connect employee teams.
 
Culture is Not an HR Function
 
Culture cannot be achieved with all-hands meetings twice a year and a daily corporate communications email. Culture is a business strategy, a guiding principle that informs how product and service decisions are made. If, for instance, CARING is part of your corporate culture, there are several business decisions and practices you need to invest in to express that care (internal funds for supporting fellow employees during hurricanes, sponsor travel so senior leaders can visit front line employees to better understand their day-to-day challenges, willingness to walk away from a product enhancement that will benefit the customer but also make your front life processes more complex and hard to maintain).  Caring costs money. Real money. Caring is even more expensive than FUN.
 
Caring can save an organization. If you have a product that is not the market leader in terms of quality and you marry it with an engaged workforce that delivers exceptional service, you actually have a shot at keeping your position as the market leader. If you don’t, there is not much going on to motivate your customers return.
 
How Do You Quantify the ROI?
 
It is fair to say that all the people who returned to you after an exceptional service experience would not have done so without having received that exceptional service. Quantify the lifetime value of those customers, and that is how you calculate your customer experience ROI.
 
Culture is a Critical Corporate Mindset
 
People are hired for culture in the true sense of that expression. If transparent leadership and instilling employee trust are values for leaders, then the pay scales of the organization should not be locked for only selected people to see. Transparency is a big word that is often repeated, but transparency is rarely backed by actions like this.
 
If transparency is on a corporation’s values list, then that corporation’s leaders must be ready to be vulnerable and to be challenged by their employees. With the right mindset, this is not a difficult value to live. Being authentic and “walking the talk” can inspire more than any other corporate action can. Transparency and vulnerability is a challenging mindset for leaders, but it gets easier to practice over time, and it is worth the investment.
 
Generally speaking, employees want to (prefer to) respect their leaders. We all need hope, we need someone to look up to, something to keep us moving forward. Employees are much more forgiving and patient with their leaders than we think, so apply a brave mindset to lead wholeheartedly. Be seen and be prepared to have an organization follow you no matter where you lead through the culture you create and the actions that support it.
 
Successful brands have strong corporate cultures that drive their employees to consistently deliver memorable experiences. Culture is the most difficult ROI to prove. It is impossible to replicate, so it can be a competitive advantage. It can also be a deterrent to hostile takeovers and mergers. Having the freedom to grow organically while creating value for customers is the greatest return on investment any business can dream of. In that sense, the ROI of culture is the highest we will ever see.
*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.
Loyalty Program Success Depends On Great CX

An Important Lesson In Retaining Customers

Loyalty programs are a great way for companies to motivate people to return and buy again and again. Customers will continue subscribing or purchasing especially when they can earn points that are redeemable for products and services they perceive as Continue reading “An Important Lesson In Retaining Customers”

AI

How Smart Do Humans Want AI To Get?

Last month we covered the basics of AI and what it is in theory. Today we will talk more about the existing practical applications of AI and reflect on what that means to us. We will also share some caution about AI, which, similar to IoT does not have existing laws to follow due to the speed of its development. It is a fact that there is no real regulation on IoT products today and there are cases filed against familiar brands like Bose.  Last month I bought my team Google home minis to inspire a culture of innovation. Sometimes I wonder… what exactly did I buy them?
 
Currently, one of the most impressive real expressions of AI is the voice-generating AI that is indistinguishable from humans. Now that is a real capability that can generate significant efficiencies in call centers (given that you have the clean data and the cloud enabled applications to power the “brain” of the AI).
 
The AI voice re-imagines the how of the interactive component of the customer experience. The innovation part is that, to the customer, there is no real change in the emotions they experience during the call. The customer still hears a friendly female voice. This AI application does to the call center what the touch screen did for cell phones in 2007.
 
Keep in mind that as you converse with the friendly female voice, the AI that powers it is learning – it is getting smarter and smarter. The question is how smart can AI get. A better question, how smart do humans want AI to get? We all have heard the story of Frankenstein. If we are not careful, we might build our own replacement.
 
If you think I am exaggerating, listen to Elon Musk who has been cautioning us against AI for years. “I think we should be very careful about artificial intelligence. If I had to guess at what our biggest existential threat is, it’s probably that… I’m increasingly inclined to think that there should be some regulatory oversight, maybe at the national and international level, just to make sure that we don’t do something very foolish.” We should most certainly embrace the future. However, we need to make sure we keep the control. With regulation and legal framework speed we might build the guardrails too late. Let’s also not forget that the master computer voice in Terminator, like those used in call centers, was female. I wonder if that is just a coincidence….
 
AI is not capable only of generating voice. It is able to “read” and to analyze human voices in a manner we have never seen. The term for this is “voice profiling.” Apparently, humans cannot detect the data/information in our voices the way AI software can. So the next time your bank asks you if you consent to record your voice for “additional security” on your account, think twice (too late for me… the TD Bank AI already has filed me away). The advancement went as far as creating a face to the voice in December. “Your voice is like your DNA  or your fingerprint.” according to Rita Singh. Thanks to today’s advanced algorithms and the large computing power available, our DNA is out in the digital space, ready to be “profiled.”
 
The reach of AI goes beyond customer service and personal banking. AI is now making hiring decisions today. Companies use AI technologies to shift through the large volume of online resumes they receive. Ostensibly, AI creates a leveled ground for all candidates and alleviates existing biases during interviews. An industry has emerged predicting either candidates’ skills based on online clues in the case of Fama or on their actions through Entelo that “guestimates” who is likely to leave a job. The situation gets creepier when we start talking about companies like HireVue. On the surface, HireVue’s solutions sound innovative  – “databased, unbiased talent decisions.” In reality, HireVue has the potential to read our faces when we speak and determine whether we are not truthful. No more saying at an interview you are leaving your current employer to pursue further development. HireVue will know you did not get along with your boss, or that you hate banking. A world in which we cannot have our internal lives sounds like a scary and lonely place.
 
What is next for the brave new world? According to the cofounder and CEO of Nvidia Huang it is “… the ability for artificial intelligence to write artificial intelligence by itself.” In other words humans will no longer be needed or even capable of running the new technology since it will be beyond our capacity to comprehend or manage. I don’t want to go back to Terminator and the Transformers, but it is hard not to see the resemblance in the plots. On the bright side, one can make a fortune in the next decade investing in those underlying technologies that will be running themselves or us in the future. This is how Huang made his fortune. We can always follow in his footsteps.
*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.
the customer experience effect jetblue liliana petrova

Keep The Customer In Focus For 2018

In her latest post for JetBlue’s Into the Blue blog series on customer experience lessons learned in 2017, our own Liliana Petrova explores how to combine innovation and knowledge of human behavior to keep the customer in focus at the same time CX professionals are developing new strategies.

Read more and watch the video.

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

 

the customer experience effect jetblue liliana petrova

What Did We Learn About CX In 2017?

In Post 2 of Liliana Petrova’s series on CX lessons learned and best practices for the new year on JetBlue, she explores the importance of “keeping the human touch” when implementing CX innovation tools.

Head over to Into the Blue, the JetBlue blog, to learn how to keep the human touch, and create better human connections.

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

 

eBay

CX Bold Moves: eBay’s Vibrant Marketplace of the Future

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series of CX Bold Moves. See all the DoingCXRight CX Bold Moves stories.

Two years ago RJ Pittman and eBay made a big bet and made AI (artificial intelligence) a core discipline of the company, similar to brand marketing and sales. The organization was able to focus and build upon existing technologies to create a truly personalized experience on eBay. This is the definition of a big bet, and the reason why eBay is part of our AI (Artificial Intelligence) series.

In the retail world of RJ Pittman, the conversational commerce does more than assist us in buying an outfit, it uses predictive analytics and AI to design the outfit if it does not exist anywhere in the world.  Now that is the ultimate personal relationship any brand can have with a customer. Once eBay is able to consistently deliver this value proposition to the customer and to scale it for the 3Bn online users today, Amazon will finally have a match – and become less ubiquitous.

How did eBay get here?

“Don’t start from the tech, start from the experience and start with transformative experiences that your customers will feel…” is how RJ Pittman summed up his approach at the Forrester conference in San Francisco this fall.  eBay is an excellent case study of a brand that followed the principles for self-service that we laid out last week – the brand will enable the customer of the future to post and sell any item without any effort or friction. Through computer vision, deep science looking at images, real time pricing, conversational commerce with interactions, and a world price guide, eBay is building an AI-enabled ecosystem that will have the power to create many real personalized experiences for all of us.

What about the eBay brand?

“The brand is the product is the brand” are the words of RJ Pittman that sum up the future of marketing. Today marketing is less about ad campaigns and more about a brand’s products and the customer experience that accompanies them. This year JetBlue achieved $33M of ad spend equivalency with its launch of facial recognition technology at the gate. This is much more brand exposure than an ad campaign. Without the existing social media and mobile technologies, that would have been impossible. But in the world in which we live, the brand is more about keeping and living the promises you have made as an organization and less about what those promises are.

This is an important note of caution for all those who have brand marketing and customer experience under two different executives. How are you ensuring that there is a real alignment between those two legs of your customer relationship?

What did eBay really do?

eBay applied technology to build a dream no one has imagined yet. The innovative brand did not merely optimize its responsive website (some of us actually even call responsive design digital revolution:( ), it invested heavily in a conversational commerce that will define how customers purchase in the future.

This disruptive strategy is not a science project. It is the birth/built of a vibrant marketplace of the future. Rik Reppe said on stage in San Francisco that courage, flexibility and imagination will make or break our efforts with AI. Listening to RJ Pittman it felt like he has all three of them. Do you?

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

new year tips doingcxright

What You Need To Do To Start 2018 Right

It is the end of December and we are all in reflective moods. Did I do enough to break into the field of Customer Experience? Did I build the right team with complementary skilled, engaged members? Did I do enough to build/maintain/scale the customer experience culture of my organization?

 

December is filled with doubts, feelings of failure and an urgent need to succeed. I can assure all of us with confidence that we all did what we could and that it is time to relax and spend some quality time with our loved ones. For any goals you did not achieve in 2017, there is always 2018 – so let’s make sure we start the new year right.

 

If you are a  job seeker
There are a few basic rules we learn in school that remain true throughout our careers. The steps for looking for a job are the same regardless of the level you are at. I know many Director level professionals who are looking for a job with a resume that has not been updated for the last ten years.

 

Write your resume (and bio if you are at a senior level). You are not too busy for that. This is one of the first steps we all have to take when we start a job search. The second step is to learn the language and concepts of the field you are pivoting intoCXPA is the best place to start that journey. If you join for $195 per year you will get access to a library of webinars, papers, experts, and a mentorship program that will allow you to connect with more senior professionals in the field who can help you with your education and job search.
By engaging with the customer experience community you might find that you are not as interested in your original goals search. Knowledge is power and that holds true in the job search process more than anywhere else.

 

For the team leaders
We all CARE about our teams. In , Frances Frei and Anne Morriss write that “[i]n most cases, the culprit is good people behaving badly, not bad people behaving badly.” Senior managers and directors do not want to be bad leaders. Unfortunately, many are. Why is that the case?  The answer is vulnerability.

 

Although it sounds like a cliché for those who still have not listened to Brene Brown’s TED Talk, it is worth spending twenty minutes this holiday season getting really comfortable with vulnerability. The hardest thing to do is to get your team together and ask each one of them what aren’t you doing well for them. Nobody is perfect and there are effort awards in life, even if we fail.

 

The fact that you show that you care will make your team appreciate you more. The difference between caring and showing that you care is demonstrating vulnerability. Give it a chance. 20 minutes.

 

For the organizations leaders
In the last few years. leaders have felt the pressure to master the meaning of customer experience culture. Depending on the maturity level of the organization the Chief Officers aim either to implement or scale their version of customer experience culture. Although we all know the theory, very few leaders walk the talk of culture.  The reason for that is that culture has real cost implications.

 

Leaders are struggling to meet the expectations of shareholders, employees and customers. On the surface, culture looks like a cost item that only covers employees. Very few leaders internalize and leverage the downstream effect of happy employees, happy customers, happy shareholders.

 

For the C-suit readers a TED Talk unfortunately would not be enough to prep for 2018. One of the favorite books of Warren Buffett, though, might be a good holiday read. will provide you with eight scenarios of what CEOs were able to accomplish when they did NOT listen to Wall Street. Capital allocation is not taught in our MBA programs and it is the biggest challenge that needs to be met before we start talking about culture (or the execution of culture).

 

Regardless of how you decide the spend the next two weeks, keep one thing in mind – the plan doesn’t have to be fully fleshed out before you start moving. Having the right aspirations and desires to be better versions of ourselves is more than half the battle. If you are reading this, that means you are striving to be better in 2018. That means you will. Onward and upward we all go!
*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.
the customer experience effect jetblue liliana petrova

What Will CX Look Like in 2018?

The JetBlue blog features Liliana Petrova in a new four-part series on Customer Experience that collects the 2017 customer experience lessons learned and charts the course for customer experience that delivers technology solutions in new and innovative ways in 2018.

Read Part 1 of the series and join us for more, over the next four weeks as we prepare for the new year.

Image courtesy of JetBlue

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Is AI Really The Answer?

Earlier this week we shared some of the pitfalls of implementing  self-service and highlighted the importance of strategic and empathetic implementation.  AI (artificial intelligence) is one of the self-service tools in the customer service professional toolbox today. It is also one of the new buzzwords, together with blockchain (for the curious ones  – my favorite explanations of blockchain are this video and this article).

The primary current positioning of AI is in call centers. The value proposition is that with AI, companies will empower customer service employees to make better decisions/recommendations, thus increasing employee engagement. Additionally, through AI, organizations will achieve significant ROI by automating the role of the customer agent (in JetBlue’s case, the crewmember) and scaling customer support without incremental headcount.

So what exactly is AI? Do you really understand what this technology can and cannot do? If you do not, keep reading as all working professionals today should understand at least the basics of AI. If you are like me, you probably get 100 sales emails every week telling you that you are running late and must leverage AI in your call centers. But do you really need AI? What problem do YOU need to solve? And is AI the best way to do that for your company?

Last month I was invited by Execs In the Know to join their AI Advisory Committee with the below mandate:

“The final group output will come in the form of a report. The exact nature of the report will be determined and framed by the group, but may include areas such as:

  • A summary of ways AI is enhancing CX channels
  • Best practices on where and how to start
  • Trends and technology in AI to improve service
  • ROI of current AI customer service initiatives
  • Perspectives and predictions about the future of AI and customer service”

This is no small mandate and it is encouraging that we have a group of professionals who are examining these questions before we all get ahead of ourselves with AI and compromise the ROI we all want so much.

The most common use of AI is ML (machine learning).  Basically, this is data mining and predictive learning on steroids that enables a computer to make decisions and interact with a human. With that basic understanding I already have a few questions to all the companies that are calling, emailing, inmailing etc., to offer me AI enabled solutions. Who, or rather what, is enabling those solutions? Is it my company’s data? Because if it is, I have a lot more work to do internally before I respond to those sales pieces.

Erik Brynjolfsson and  Andrew Mcafee provide a comprehensive explanation of what AI is and what it is not in their publication The Business of Artificial Intelligence. In it they state that AI technology is ready for implementation in the business world and that “[t]he bottleneck now is in management, implementation, and business imagination.” I do have the business imagination, but I also am taking my time to know exactly what capability I am buying with AI. It might be cheaper to streamline processes and fix existing software tools or integrations to enable my employees to deliver excellent customer service, instead of paying for yet another software integration that makes decisions based on my bad data (since I would have prioritized the purchase of the expensive AI solution over cleaning my existing data).

Although it is clear that AI will be a solution that needs demonstrated ROI and employee adoption for success while it is learning, it is also clear that we cannot wait too long to get comfortable with this new technology. As Erik and Andrew say, one thing is pretty sure: “[o]ver the next decade, AI won’t replace managers, but managers who use AI will replace those who don’t”.

That is the exact reason I chose to join the AI Advisory Committee. More to come!

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

When Not To Invest In Self-Service Technology?

Every progressive brand today aspires to have more self-service. Very few implement self-service successfully. Self-service is a new tool to optimize a company’s workforce by removing transactions from the system. All industries are looking at self-service as a strategy of the future.

Hospitals, airlines, and hotels are installing kiosks to self check-in while grocery stores and taxi companies are implementing self-service check out with digital payment products. The list goes on and on. What differentiates a successful use of self-service as a building block of innovation from a failed implementation that adds more effort for the customer that leaves him/her angry and frustrated?

Successful self-service is self-sufficient. It enables customers to meet all their needs by themselves. If users can do only some of the steps of the whole process alone then self-service adds costs to the business, adds complexity and effort to the experience. For example, if a customer can print his/her food voucher when there is a delay, but cannot rebook him/herself (i.e. still needs to call customer service) then all the brand has accomplished is to add steps for the customer to get the same value he/she could have done before with ONLY a phone call.

Another thing to be aware of with self-service is what type of labor is optimized and what labor is part of the self-service solution. The business case of self-service might not work if the solution requires incremental (and expensive) IT resources while removing existing (and cheaper) unskilled resources. As Matthew Dixon says in  :  “[t]he challenge is not in getting today’s customer to try self-service. The challenge lies in getting today’s customer to avoid channel switching from self-service to a live phone call… the self-service battle isn’t about getting customers to go, it’s about getting them to stay.” It is important to launch the solution that solves all the needs of the customer before launching a technology solution to avoid getting the wrong results.

Design for 80% of the customer base, not the high touch 5% – 10%.  The 5% base solution is more expensive and most probably will break the business case.  Be ready for all the people who will question the design that will NOT cover 100% of the customers. Questions about the exceptions will keep coming up: “What is the customer does not have a credit card? What if the customer does not speak English? What if …?” The answer to all of them is: “They will go to the full service option at that touch point. They will not self-serve.” Be strong and keep the focus on the goals of self-service – to alleviate, not eliminate, the calls to the contact center; to allow the employees to offer a better service to those people who do not have a credit card and/or do not speak English. It is counterintuitive, but by not solving for them through self-service, we are building a better service for the exceptions as well.

Be brave! Some people will not like the self-service design. You will hear a lot of push back about de-humanizing the experience for the customers. Anjali Lai from Forrester studied the emotions of brand interactions (see below) and was able to show that there is no significant difference in the perception of the customers when they self-serve (from interacting with a live person).

What is more human? To have a human tell a customer that he/she is not able to solve the problem, because the process is not designed well or that they will be put on a brief call to speak to another person, or having self-service solutions that empower customers to create their own experiences in a personalized and independent way (without telling their names and confirmation numbers 2 or more times).

Self-service is an integral part of the future, but unless self-service is designed and executed in a strategic and empathetic manner it can drive more costs and complaints than savings and satisfaction. The basic value creation mandate is critical in this business strategy: unless self-service creates real value for the customer he/she will not embrace it.

So ask yourself, if you were the customer, would you gain anything from doing a task yourself vs. getting help from the company? As the company, do you gain anything by self-serving? Is it faster, easier or simpler? If you cannot answer yes to any of those questions, do not invest in self-service technology.

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Liliana Petrova

From Pain Points to Magical Moments: Transform the Customer Experience

Argyle Journal recently interviewed customer experience professional (and Doing CX Right writer) Liliana Petrova about emerging self service technology and meeting and exceeding customer expectations in airports.

Liliana brings out a point that is integral to all technology-based customer experience solutions, namely that “[w]e want to create something that feels like magic, without breaking any foundational rules.”

Of that magic and the quest to create it as part of customer experience, Liliana explains, “[i]f there is a way to create a seamless and invisible experience, we want to find a way to get there.”

Read more about how she and her team are working to do so.

Play the audio below to hear Liliana speak about the magical customer experience.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Rutgers Customer Experience Course

How To Improve Your CX Skills

Delivering great customer experiences has become a top priority for many companies. Given the increased focus, employees with CX skills are in great demand. While on the job training and reading books provide great learnings, completing a formal education program can accelerate one’s knowledge. Earlier this year, I began exploring academic programs that would expand my understanding of CX best practices as well as provide an opportunity to meet people across different industries who have instituted successful customer-centric programs at their workplace. After evaluating different schools, I ended up attending Rutgers University. Having completed the course and received my certification recently, I can confidently recommend Rutgers for several reasons:

  • The class content is very relevant and applicable. Students gain access to helpful tools and templates that they can bring back to their jobs to make an impact.
  • Classes are taught by top executives and leaders with CX expertise. The speakers all share meaningful examples that reinforce various lessons around developing personas, journey maps, use cases, measurement, culture and more. 
  • The program offers much flexibility. People can take the course online or offline in a classroom setting. 
  • It is a real, university-backed program – not a seminar or conference.

If you are interested in learning more about my personal experience with the program, feel free to contact me at: doingcxright@gmail.com. If you have detailed questions about the course and want to sign up, visit Rutgers’s website: >here

We got our readers a 20% discount off the total tuition cost for the CX course as well as three other courses: Cyber Security, Design Thinking, and Big Data. Simply join our free blog to grab the promo code to save during program registration. We look forward to hearing from you.

All About DoingCXRight

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Liliana Petrova in front of NYU Stern students

Am I A Good Candidate For A Customer Experience Role?

“When the student is ready, the master will appear.” – Unknown

People often ask me what experience they need to be a good fit for customer experience roles. When I spoke at NYU Stern recently, I was faced with the same questions. Students Continue Reading →

self-boarding with facial recognition at a JetBlue gate.

CX Bold Moves: JetBlue Paperless And Deviceless Boarding

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series of CX Bold Moves. See all the DoingCXRight CX Bold Moves stories.

This year JetBlue entered the ranks of the innovators who disrupt industries and not only imagine the future, but also build it. With our award winning facial recognition boarding technology we were able to provide a preview to our customers of what traveling will be in the future. The fact that JetBlue’s facial recognition trial was named as one of the 100 greatest innovations of 2017 by Popular Science was one of the many signs we received about the excitement of the public about innovation in the airline space. JetBlue realized that our customers are not only ready, but also eager to step into a world of  new experiences that are personal, helpful, and simple.

So why is it so hard to eliminate the friction points on the travel journey and enable repeatable, intuitive, and empathetic experiences when we fly?

Variability is almost impossible to manage

In the book “Uncommon Service” Frances Frei and Anne Morriss lay a whole customer management process for successful brands. They present several examples of Progressive Insurance and Shouldice Hospital where through different processes these organizations are able to select the right customers for the experiences they have built. Airlines cannot do that. We cannot choose who we fly. Since the industry is driven by small margins, every customer flown counts. JetBlue’s mission bring humanity back in the air travel is driving us to welcome on board anybody who would like to fly us. And we consistently design all our product and experiences with that in mind!

Integrated experiences are based on integrated technologies

The future of flying is here only if we are able to integrate virtual reality and other technologies in a meaningful way that adds value. In JetBlue we are collaborating with JetBlue Technology Ventures and Strivr to test VR for training of our maintenance crewmembers.  The technology is more advanced in helping with decision making and not necessarily recreating the feeling of loading bags under the plane. For those immersive experiences the integration, build and scaling of the experiences is much more complex. Integrated and intuitive experiences are not hard to imagine, they are very complex to create and personalize.

Somebody has to pay for it

The moment we begin scaling and implementing customer journeys that use technologies of the future, we have to build the business case and its ROI. CFOs see customer experience design projects as process effectiveness work that increases output of existing infrastructure. Customer experience is much more than that of course, but knowing your audience is half the battle. Regardless if you agree with finance or no, you need the funding they hold. If you list the funding and maintenance requirements for a VR or a biometric solution very quickly you will see that to extract value from future technologies, you also need other future technologies to be cheaper. We all depend on a faster network (5G, 8G, 10G?) and even cheaper storage (cloud that is free to maintain and does not hit your operating expense every year?). Until that happens we probably will trial more and scale less.

We all share the excitement for the possibilities that new technologies like facial recognition and VR bring to us today. Some of us even venture to realize and share those possibilities with our customers. Customers have the power to add and co-design their experiences, which is really exciting too. In JetBlue we  used facial recognition boarding  to lead the industry. Our innovation was embraced by our customers and that is why we all won at the end!

# biometrics #facial recognition #VR #disruption # customer experience # game changer #NY Times #JetBlue

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

cx bold moves customer experience news t-mobile replaces remote workforce

CX Bold Moves: Mobile Provider Eliminates Remote Workforce

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series of CX Bold Moves. See all the DoingCXRight CX Bold Moves stories.

When it comes to customer support we all want the same things. We measure the efficiency metrics FCR (first call resolution), average wait time and talk time. We train our contact center agents to be personal and helpful.  Some of us even build incentives around goals for ancillary sales. When it comes to delivering on those KPIs right, customer experience managers have a lot in common. None of us has figured out how to deliver on all metrics. We are happy if we get one of them right!

Making Customers Feel Good when They Call

At JetBlue, our contact center is our heart. Our Contact Center crewmembers live the company’s mission to inspire humanity. If you want to feel what JetBlue is about, dial 1800 JetBlue where the customer experience is driven by empathy and understanding. And that is before we even train our crewmembers on our hospitality standards (that will happen in a few months as planned on the rollout roadmap).

JetBlue further empowers those crewmembers to be BlueHeros – to act as citizens, protect the JetBlue brand, and do the right thing for the customer when things go wrong. This is how we approach contact center management.

Loyalty that’s Worth the Wait

T-Mobile, self-described “Un-Carrier” is taking on a different approach. Two weeks ago at the Forrester conference in San Francisco, Sid Bothra shared the brand’s new strategy of call centers management. Instead of having frontline agents work from home, T-Mobile launched mini-call center “pods” of approximately 50 people each that cover specific geography and have cross-functional agents. Those groups are managed as P&L centers, not only as cost centers.

This is a completely new and risky approach that maximizes FCR at the expense of wait and talk times. Yes, in the new world, customer calls will not be transferred a second (or third) time. With this design, the agent who knows data sits next to the network specialist and the international calls expert. The agent’s efficiency loss, however, will be substantial and impact both wait and call times.

The results Sid Bothra shared were inspiring. As expected, customers now wait 2x longer (from 40 seconds to 1m-1.3m), but NPS went up by 50% and employee retention increased by 75%. In addition, customer share of the wallet also increased because now, callers are more open to buying ancillary products.

Sid Bothra’s plan is a great example of thinking outside of the box and challenging the norm. Very few traditional call center leaders would agree with this new approach.  In the long run, though, giving employees a sense of ownership of the business is the best way to inspire excellent service and care. It sounds like T-Mobile has found one way to do just that. It is one thing to feel like a cost, a burden to a business. It is another thing to feel empowered to earn money for your company and manage profits for your investors.

Recalibrating Goals

There is a third view on call centers that contradicts both JetBlue’s strategy and T-Mobile’s. Matthew Dixon in his book states that “any customer service interaction is four times more likely to drive disloyalty than to drive loyalty.”  Dixon argues that our efforts to make customers happy when they reach out to our contact centers is not the right approach because at the point of the call, we have lost their loyalty.  Dixon recalibrates the goal of customer service to mitigate that negative impact by reducing effort because reducing effort is more tangible to the customer and more sustainable to organizations than our current work to delight our callers.

Regardless of the approach, you decide to take with your call center management, I urge you to be disruptive, even to yourself, and not to look at the traditional models. Technology advancements are adding more tools to our toolboxes and the new workforce is looking for more meaning and impact in any job. T-Mobile has addressed both opportunities in a creative and innovative way that has potential to differentiate them in the future.

That could be you!

If you like this article, please share with others so they can benefit. Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Driving Return Customers

How To Turn Your Customers Into Repeat Purchasers

The smallest gestures by frontline employees can be a significant reason shoppers turn into repeat buyers. I was reminded of this recently when purchasing at a large department store. Upon bringing my new clothes to the cashier,

Continue Reading →

CX Bold Moves: Starbucks Bets On The Physical Experience

Editor’s Note: This post is part of a series of CX Bold Moves. See all the DoingCXRight CX Bold Moves stories.

This month Starbucks closed its online store.  In April of this year Executive Chairman and former CEO Howard Schultz took a stand in front of his investors:  “Your product and services, for the most part, cannot be available online and cannot be available on Amazon.” In a time when brands are investing in omni-channel experience, Starbucks makes the bold move to close the foundational web channel and focus on the in-person experience.

How big is the risk Starbucks is taking of losing loyal customers who buy merchandise online? Companies like Ryanair and IndiGo designed check- in for flights primarily on their apps and their customers adapted accordingly.  Over time, customer behavior follows the design put in front of them.  Yes, some Starbucks customers will miss their pumpkin spice syrup. The loss of their loyalty though will free capital for Starbucks to create an even more seamless app experience and re-imagine its physical spaces. That sounds like a great trade off in the long run!

This is not the first bold move Starbucks has taken. In 2011 the brand dropped the name Starbucks and the word coffee from its logo.  Around the same time the company began testing its “evening program” and expanded its product offering to include wine and beer in select locations.  With those tactical moves the brand strategy emerged – Starbucks was trying to reposition itself as a lifestyle brand. In January 2017 we heard the last call on the alcohol idea. With the closing of the online store it is clear that the brand is on to the next approach toward the goal of lifestyle brand presence. Will the brand be successful this time?

Smart brands make bold decisions to drive the customer where they want him/her to be. The only way to drive customers to a desired channel is to take away their choices. As long as the choice is available, customers will make it.   It is clear that Howard Schultz wants us to be in his stores. But unless he gives us an immersive experiences with cleverly designed space we might not stay there long.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

VP of Listening, brand image, future purchases

One Person Can Make Or Break A Brand’s Image

We all interact with companies when shopping for products and services. Sometimes we talk to representatives in person, such as at a retail store, while other times we chat online or call customer care. Regardless of where the interaction occurs, Continue Reading →

Social Media, Customer Experience, Brand Image

How Does Social Media Affect Customer Experience?

Social Media is the only real-time channel for successful brands to manage customer experience and brand management.

Customer Perspective

Social Media is the Voice of the Customer.  That voice shares with the world the customer experience of brands. When it is good, it becomes a brand ambassador and promoter. When it is bad that voice erodes brand equity and tarnished the existing brand image. This year Pepsi tried to be relevant and used social racism protests for the set up of its latest ad. The backlash on social media was an immediate customer engagement that Pepsi had to manage to keep the intended brand message on point. The perception of the customers did not match the intention of the brand. When JetBlue was redesigning the JFK lobby in New York we hoped to hear comparisons to the Apple store on social media as a sign that we have built the experience we imagined. The tweets came and we knew. Our brand message has been received.

Social media is a collaborative space for the customer to engage with brands on products design and usability. Customers discuss product specifications and, in some cases, build their own products. Glossier’s best-selling product was produced entirely on the feedback of customers on social media. Regardless of brand strategy, today’s engineers and designers must tune in to social media and allow the customer to co-create products and services.

Today customer experience is equal to social media. Customers expect to self-serve on social media. They look for real-time recovery of their experiences and expect the brands to listen at all times. When an airline cancels a flight, customers reach out on Twitter and Facebook to rebook themselves on the next flight or book a hotel if the flight is not the same day.  Effective brands leverage these various conversations to build brand engagement and loyalty. The brand becomes another friend on social media. A loyal and helpful friend that listens and builds experiences with the customer.

Brand Perspective

Social Media is a real-time channel for brands to engage with the customer. It is a tool to build customer expectations for the product and service experiences to follow. The brand can communicate product features and educate the audience on a specific topic. If these messages match the actual customer experience the brand equity undoubtedly grows and the connection with the customer gets stronger.

Social Media is a measure for brands to assess if the experiences perception of the customer matches the experience intention of the brand. Successful brand managers not only have social media accounts but also utilize them effectively to communicate their brand image and listen if the message is received or no. They use social media to make things right when they go wrong and offer self-service options for operational recovery and self-help.  For the authentic brand, social media is a competitive advantage. It is the channel to manage customer experience and build brand engagement. The brands that understand that first will not only win the millennials tomorrow but every customer who expects relevant and personal customer experience today.

If you like this article, please share with others so they can benefit. Sign Up for our newsletter to continue learning how to increase your skills and transform your organization! When you register now, you will get free access to our whitepaper on how to go from CX Novice to CX Expert.

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

doing cx right, doing CEX right

Meet Doing CX Right

Are you passionate about Customer Experience (CX)?

Are you confused about where to begin transforming your organization to be more customer-centric? Are you wondering if you should even do this transformation or if Customer Experience is just another buzz word that will disappear in a few years? Are you a start up that has reached a point where your sales representatives have become complaint agents, and you do not know how to scale to gain repeat happy customers?

If you have asked yourself these and related questions, then you have come to the right place. We are two thought leaders, who are passionate about everything CX and have much to share given over 15+ years of experience. (Learn about us Here.) Our goal is to provide readers with relevant and actionable information, as well as foster a community for continued knowledge sharing.

While we don’t know where this journey will take us, we are committed to making a difference and excited to publicly launch today, October 3, 2017, also known National CX Day. We look forward to your feedback as “Voice of the Customer” matters in everything we do.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.

Customer Experience ROI. Is It Worth Doing?

The business case for Customer Service is complex. Gone are the days when we bought a piece of hardware that depreciates over 5 or 10 years on the balance sheet. Customer Experience does not even show up on our assets list. At least not with that name.

The ROI of Customer Experience is in the revenue and customer growth of your organization. It is in the engagement of your customer base that leads to ancillary sales. It is in the strength of your brand image and the worth of your brand equity.The challenge business leaders face justifying investments (especially big ones) is because these relationships  are not linear. Today’s CFO need’s to understand the value of marketing more than ever. Customer Experience is equal to brand management and if you underestimate the importance of either, you might not be in business in 5 years.

Customer Experience ROI is the same as your company’s strategy ROI. If you don’t have a defined brand and marketing strategy backed up with a complimentary communications strategy you will not see Customer Experience ROI regardless of your investments. Think about your strategy and argue the case for Customer Experience investments as an execution of a strategy, not as a business case.

 

 

*All opinions expressed on the DoingCXRight Blog and site pages are the authors’ alone and do not reflect the opinions of or imply the endorsement of employers or other organizations.